Posts tagged stories

My grandpa was kept in first grade until he was- no joke- THIRTEEN. Eyesight testing didn’t start in Kentucky until 1925, and as soon as they started that they noticed that he was blind as a bat and only was able to pretend that he had the slightest clue what was going on because he was using shadows and hearing. They knew he wasn’t stupid since he was still picking stuff up, but he couldn’t read at ALL. He actually ended up graduating a year of the rest of his class because he loved learning like a mofo. He eventually died while reading a chess strategy book. o_O

My grandpa was kept in first grade until he was- no joke- THIRTEEN. Eyesight testing didn’t start in Kentucky until 1925, and as soon as they started that they noticed that he was blind as a bat and only was able to pretend that he had the slightest clue what was going on because he was using shadows and hearing. They knew he wasn’t stupid since he was still picking stuff up, but he couldn’t read at ALL. He actually ended up graduating a year of the rest of his class because he loved learning like a mofo. He eventually died while reading a chess strategy book. o_O

Everyone’s heard of how devastating the 1918 flu epidemic was. Sometimes it’s hard to truly understand the scope of things when all you see is massive numbers and statistics.
This photograph was taken in a family’s home on the East coast (unsure where, but was urban) when a neighbor (who was a reporter) hadn’t heard from the family for several days. The father, mother, and infant child had all died, and the other five young children were all critically ill, and four of them would have likely died within the day. The five children were taken to a hospital and all five recovered, though two of them took over five weeks to be stable enough to leave.
I don’t know what happened to the kids after that. It was noted that they were from a Catholic family (not sure why it was relevant). Perhaps it was large enough that their parents siblings were willing to take them in. Many children who lost parents ended up in orphanages and were easily exploited. Some took to the streets. It was a bleak outlook.

Everyone’s heard of how devastating the 1918 flu epidemic was. Sometimes it’s hard to truly understand the scope of things when all you see is massive numbers and statistics.

This photograph was taken in a family’s home on the East coast (unsure where, but was urban) when a neighbor (who was a reporter) hadn’t heard from the family for several days. The father, mother, and infant child had all died, and the other five young children were all critically ill, and four of them would have likely died within the day. The five children were taken to a hospital and all five recovered, though two of them took over five weeks to be stable enough to leave.

I don’t know what happened to the kids after that. It was noted that they were from a Catholic family (not sure why it was relevant). Perhaps it was large enough that their parents siblings were willing to take them in. Many children who lost parents ended up in orphanages and were easily exploited. Some took to the streets. It was a bleak outlook.

1936 photograph of Lakeview Sanatorium and nurses’ dormitory in Madison, WI. 
That hill is steeper than it looks, and the road is now closer to the tree line in the front of the photo. I believe that the nurse’s dorm is gone, and the side of the hill is covered in pines, with massive willows at the bottom. 
I have fond memories of that area. The woods are beautiful, and there’s a very old cemetery along a path behind the larger of the buildings. Part of the old sanatorium is used as offices, but I believe the other part is not used at all. I wish I were able to explore it. The hill is great for sledding, and every year, there are hundreds of people that gather on the last weekend of June for the Rhythm & Booms fireworks show. The main staging place is at Warner Park just down the street, but the people in the neighborhood tend to gather on the hill.
The old sanatoriums I’ve seen always seem to transform into places of life, rather than a place where people go to die.

1936 photograph of Lakeview Sanatorium and nurses’ dormitory in Madison, WI. 

That hill is steeper than it looks, and the road is now closer to the tree line in the front of the photo. I believe that the nurse’s dorm is gone, and the side of the hill is covered in pines, with massive willows at the bottom. 

I have fond memories of that area. The woods are beautiful, and there’s a very old cemetery along a path behind the larger of the buildings. Part of the old sanatorium is used as offices, but I believe the other part is not used at all. I wish I were able to explore it. The hill is great for sledding, and every year, there are hundreds of people that gather on the last weekend of June for the Rhythm & Booms fireworks show. The main staging place is at Warner Park just down the street, but the people in the neighborhood tend to gather on the hill.

The old sanatoriums I’ve seen always seem to transform into places of life, rather than a place where people go to die.