Posts tagged sanitation

drtuesdaygjohnson:

ca. 1880, Antique Steam Medicinal Atomizer, Codman & Shurtleff,         Boston
via

drtuesdaygjohnson:

ca. 1880, Antique Steam Medicinal Atomizer, Codman & Shurtleff, Boston

via

1939 WPA Posters for the Improvement of Public Health

While the flies were a visible and tangible problem when one did not have an outhouse or latrine installed, the real danger, as I stated before, was from hookworm infection, and the subsequent destruction of the productivity of those afflicted. To be sure, dysentery and cholera spread by flies were serious dangers. However, they presented themselves in a most obvious fashion, and medical care could then be given. Hookworm? Well, if you don’t know you have something, you probably aren’t going to go to the doctor just cause you’re feeling tired and run down, especially if that’s the only way you’ve felt your entire life.

Posters from Library of Congress Archives: For the People, By the People WPA Project.

1863. Private Milton E. Wallen, Co. C, 1st Kentucky Cavalry.
Private Wallen was wounded by a Minie ball while in prison. His arm was amputated and was beginning to heal well, but after a week he began to develop hospital gangrene in the amputated stump.
Hospital gangrene was very common back in the days before antiseptic practices. As opposed to the conditions considered to be forms of gangrene today (gas, dry, wet), “hospital gangrene” was largely caused by Clostridium spp., and was quickly fatal. As Clostridium are bacteria that thrive in the lower GI tract, hospitals with poor sanitation (and consequently widespread fecal contamination) have far higher rates of hospital gangrene death.

1863. Private Milton E. Wallen, Co. C, 1st Kentucky Cavalry.

Private Wallen was wounded by a Minie ball while in prison. His arm was amputated and was beginning to heal well, but after a week he began to develop hospital gangrene in the amputated stump.

Hospital gangrene was very common back in the days before antiseptic practices. As opposed to the conditions considered to be forms of gangrene today (gas, dry, wet), “hospital gangrene” was largely caused by Clostridium spp., and was quickly fatal. As Clostridium are bacteria that thrive in the lower GI tract, hospitals with poor sanitation (and consequently widespread fecal contamination) have far higher rates of hospital gangrene death.

What I’m reading right now.
Dr. Lister’s spirit would cry.
More on the book when I finish it. Yes, it is about what it looks like. The benefits of putting dirt on surgical wounds.

What I’m reading right now.

Dr. Lister’s spirit would cry.

More on the book when I finish it. Yes, it is about what it looks like. The benefits of putting dirt on surgical wounds.

Japanese public health poster on the spreading of cholera and how to stop it.

Japanese public health poster on the spreading of cholera and how to stop it.