Posts tagged madison

Representative Herbert C. Dreger, shot to death on South Murray street. His funeral was widely attended…by KKK members in full uniform.
And no one batted an eye.

Representative Herbert C. Dreger, shot to death on South Murray street. His funeral was widely attended…by KKK members in full uniform.

And no one batted an eye.

1915 postcard depicting the newly finished St. Mary’s Hospital in Madison, WI. Construction was completed in 1911, hospital opened in 1912. 
As someone who’s spent lots of time over in that area, that is a TINY hospital! I’m pretty sure that the parking garage is at least 3 times larger than the original hospital…

1915 postcard depicting the newly finished St. Mary’s Hospital in Madison, WI. Construction was completed in 1911, hospital opened in 1912. 

As someone who’s spent lots of time over in that area, that is a TINY hospital! I’m pretty sure that the parking garage is at least 3 times larger than the original hospital…

1918 photograph of two Red Cross nurses in Madison, WI. They were stationed with a mobile Red Cross unit in Europe during WWI.

1918 photograph of two Red Cross nurses in Madison, WI. They were stationed with a mobile Red Cross unit in Europe during WWI.

46-year-old Marguerite Halvorson at Methodist Hospital in Madison, WI. 1936. This was her 17th baby, and it was noted that she was a poor woman who had 16 of her 17 kids survive childhood. I find that fascinating and impressive (even for a more wealthy person), but at the same time, she’s in a private room and giving birth in a hospital. It may have been more and more common for childbirth to occur in hospitals, and it was pretty much everywhere by 1940, but the fact that she was in a private room makes me feel that she wasn’t as terribly impoverished as many of the women who gave birth to huge numbers of children in the large East coast cites and in Ireland.

46-year-old Marguerite Halvorson at Methodist Hospital in Madison, WI. 1936. This was her 17th baby, and it was noted that she was a poor woman who had 16 of her 17 kids survive childhood. I find that fascinating and impressive (even for a more wealthy person), but at the same time, she’s in a private room and giving birth in a hospital. It may have been more and more common for childbirth to occur in hospitals, and it was pretty much everywhere by 1940, but the fact that she was in a private room makes me feel that she wasn’t as terribly impoverished as many of the women who gave birth to huge numbers of children in the large East coast cites and in Ireland.

1936 photograph of Lakeview Sanatorium and nurses’ dormitory in Madison, WI. 
That hill is steeper than it looks, and the road is now closer to the tree line in the front of the photo. I believe that the nurse’s dorm is gone, and the side of the hill is covered in pines, with massive willows at the bottom. 
I have fond memories of that area. The woods are beautiful, and there’s a very old cemetery along a path behind the larger of the buildings. Part of the old sanatorium is used as offices, but I believe the other part is not used at all. I wish I were able to explore it. The hill is great for sledding, and every year, there are hundreds of people that gather on the last weekend of June for the Rhythm & Booms fireworks show. The main staging place is at Warner Park just down the street, but the people in the neighborhood tend to gather on the hill.
The old sanatoriums I’ve seen always seem to transform into places of life, rather than a place where people go to die.

1936 photograph of Lakeview Sanatorium and nurses’ dormitory in Madison, WI. 

That hill is steeper than it looks, and the road is now closer to the tree line in the front of the photo. I believe that the nurse’s dorm is gone, and the side of the hill is covered in pines, with massive willows at the bottom. 

I have fond memories of that area. The woods are beautiful, and there’s a very old cemetery along a path behind the larger of the buildings. Part of the old sanatorium is used as offices, but I believe the other part is not used at all. I wish I were able to explore it. The hill is great for sledding, and every year, there are hundreds of people that gather on the last weekend of June for the Rhythm & Booms fireworks show. The main staging place is at Warner Park just down the street, but the people in the neighborhood tend to gather on the hill.

The old sanatoriums I’ve seen always seem to transform into places of life, rather than a place where people go to die.

Wisconsin State Hospital for the Insane in Madison, WI. 1860.
Now known as the Mendota Mental Health Institute. The woods and marshland around it are beautiful, and there are massive eagle effigy mounds on the grounds. Grew up about 5 minutes from there.

Wisconsin State Hospital for the Insane in Madison, WI. 1860.

Now known as the Mendota Mental Health Institute. The woods and marshland around it are beautiful, and there are massive eagle effigy mounds on the grounds. Grew up about 5 minutes from there.