Posts tagged long read

Answers!
[nope, for those wondering, I still can’t answer ask box questions]
From the top down:
izzyfig: I wish!…well, no, actually I’m not sure I really wish that. PhDs are a LOT of work. My mom has a PhD in microeconomics, and she didn’t finish that until I was almost 8 years old. She didn’t have me until after she got her masters degree, and didn’t take a break or anything, either. Long story short, no, I definitely do not have a PhD. I’m not even 25 yet! I’m hoping to eventually go back to school for a masters in some aspect of biotechnology or microbiology. Probably not a PhD, though.
knowun: I’m not sure. Consistently-oceanic parts of tectonic plates are not conducive to fossil formation, and any fossils on the seafloor would have to be in areas that were once dry for a long enough period to have deeply-buried specimens, and I’m not really sure how much of our ocean meets anything close to that ideal condition. If you’re less picky and include lakes and inland seas, then the case is a LOT. Almost every lake or inland sea was once dry land. Any large non-glacial and non-volcanic lake almost certainly has *some* fossil specimens deep under its floor.
johnlaughingalonewithyaoi: Done. Sort of. I’ll definitely return to the subject in the future.
shroom-diabolique: Sure. Don’t eat them much, though. Plain crisps make my tongue swell up and hurt for some reason. I’m not sure why flavored ones don’t.
desirescasualty: AOL Kids Only. 1994. I was so cool.
inexplicablespaceship: Unfortunately, I haven’t been to a ton of museums, especially lately. I love the Chicago Museum of Science and Industry, and have learned tons every time I’ve been there. The Field Museum and Shedd Aquarium are pretty boss, too. I’m particular to the Science and Industry and Field Museums over the Shedd Aquarium, if only because of the much lower entrance fees and the fact that I learn a lot more there, but they’re all fun. From what I’ve heard from friends, the best aquarium to really *learn* at is Ripley’s Aquarium of the Smokies in Tennessee, and the best science museum (in the US) for the above-schoolchild age crowd is split between the Museum of Science and Industry in Chicago and the one in Oregon. Mind you, this is just my friends, not the general public, but there are great museums all over the world…you don’t need to be at the “best of the best” to learn new things and find great exhibits you would have never expected!
paintedgraves: I’ll be honest, my attention has been largely diverted to personal matters, politics, and work lately. I don’t really remember what the last thing I got so interested in that I stayed up all night reading about it, which is a bit sad…I used to do that all the time. I’ve been very interested in the science of emotions (especially the neurology of those who seek horror and the like), but that’s not exactly breaking news. The only recent science story that’s grabbed my attention for a significant period has been the new study published on color perception (decent breakdown of the study), and how it differs from person-to-person.
carathebug: [second part answered previously] no, I don’t have a big collection of biomed stuff, myself. I’m always a bit extremely broke, thanks to not having a “real” job yet, and wanting to pay back my loans quickly. Either way, I’d be more inclined to collect natural history ephemera (I love love love well-presented specimens and gardens in glass baubles/cases/containers), and old adverts/postcards regarding medicine, than biomed items themselves. :D
marisalorea: I’m not sure how much I really want to make a point of putting this out there now that my parents know of this blog, but my personal blog is ofpaperandponies.tumblr.com. Short version: Mid-20s female, generally stressed out but complacent with it, non-religious, semi-political, in a fairly long-term (does 7 years count as long-term?) with a guy whose ambition is to teach seventh-grade (12-13 year old kids) social studies (aka an insane person). Two cats. Pretty weird, myself, sometimes very sarcastic. I love animals, craft a lot when I have actual free time, and am pretty solidly into games (both video and tabletop).
lokithefulltiltgodofdiva: I can’t go into “fake diseases” or “fake cures” of the modern age without going into a seething rage due to the idiocy >_> But! 1870-1906 is what I see as the “golden age” of Quackery and Bullshit. We were just discovering electricity, radiation, and tons of chemicals. And naturally people exploited the fact that we didn’t *really* understand these new discoveries by saying it cured everything. And I have some posts on it already, but just like medieval medicine, I’ll definitely return to it again soon.

Answers!

[nope, for those wondering, I still can’t answer ask box questions]

From the top down:

  1. izzyfig: I wish!…well, no, actually I’m not sure I really wish that. PhDs are a LOT of work. My mom has a PhD in microeconomics, and she didn’t finish that until I was almost 8 years old. She didn’t have me until after she got her masters degree, and didn’t take a break or anything, either. Long story short, no, I definitely do not have a PhD. I’m not even 25 yet! I’m hoping to eventually go back to school for a masters in some aspect of biotechnology or microbiology. Probably not a PhD, though.
  2. knowun: I’m not sure. Consistently-oceanic parts of tectonic plates are not conducive to fossil formation, and any fossils on the seafloor would have to be in areas that were once dry for a long enough period to have deeply-buried specimens, and I’m not really sure how much of our ocean meets anything close to that ideal condition. If you’re less picky and include lakes and inland seas, then the case is a LOT. Almost every lake or inland sea was once dry land. Any large non-glacial and non-volcanic lake almost certainly has *some* fossil specimens deep under its floor.
  3. johnlaughingalonewithyaoi: Done. Sort of. I’ll definitely return to the subject in the future.
  4. shroom-diabolique: Sure. Don’t eat them much, though. Plain crisps make my tongue swell up and hurt for some reason. I’m not sure why flavored ones don’t.
  5. desirescasualty: AOL Kids Only. 1994. I was so cool.
  6. inexplicablespaceship: Unfortunately, I haven’t been to a ton of museums, especially lately. I love the Chicago Museum of Science and Industry, and have learned tons every time I’ve been there. The Field Museum and Shedd Aquarium are pretty boss, too. I’m particular to the Science and Industry and Field Museums over the Shedd Aquarium, if only because of the much lower entrance fees and the fact that I learn a lot more there, but they’re all fun. From what I’ve heard from friends, the best aquarium to really *learn* at is Ripley’s Aquarium of the Smokies in Tennessee, and the best science museum (in the US) for the above-schoolchild age crowd is split between the Museum of Science and Industry in Chicago and the one in Oregon. Mind you, this is just my friends, not the general public, but there are great museums all over the world…you don’t need to be at the “best of the best” to learn new things and find great exhibits you would have never expected!
  7. paintedgraves: I’ll be honest, my attention has been largely diverted to personal matters, politics, and work lately. I don’t really remember what the last thing I got so interested in that I stayed up all night reading about it, which is a bit sad…I used to do that all the time. I’ve been very interested in the science of emotions (especially the neurology of those who seek horror and the like), but that’s not exactly breaking news. The only recent science story that’s grabbed my attention for a significant period has been the new study published on color perception (decent breakdown of the study), and how it differs from person-to-person.
  8. carathebug: [second part answered previously] no, I don’t have a big collection of biomed stuff, myself. I’m always a bit extremely broke, thanks to not having a “real” job yet, and wanting to pay back my loans quickly. Either way, I’d be more inclined to collect natural history ephemera (I love love love well-presented specimens and gardens in glass baubles/cases/containers), and old adverts/postcards regarding medicine, than biomed items themselves. :D
  9. marisalorea: I’m not sure how much I really want to make a point of putting this out there now that my parents know of this blog, but my personal blog is ofpaperandponies.tumblr.com. Short version: Mid-20s female, generally stressed out but complacent with it, non-religious, semi-political, in a fairly long-term (does 7 years count as long-term?) with a guy whose ambition is to teach seventh-grade (12-13 year old kids) social studies (aka an insane person). Two cats. Pretty weird, myself, sometimes very sarcastic. I love animals, craft a lot when I have actual free time, and am pretty solidly into games (both video and tabletop).
  10. lokithefulltiltgodofdiva: I can’t go into “fake diseases” or “fake cures” of the modern age without going into a seething rage due to the idiocy >_> But! 1870-1906 is what I see as the “golden age” of Quackery and Bullshit. We were just discovering electricity, radiation, and tons of chemicals. And naturally people exploited the fact that we didn’t *really* understand these new discoveries by saying it cured everything. And I have some posts on it already, but just like medieval medicine, I’ll definitely return to it again soon.
March 25, 1911. New York, New York. 4:40 PM. 
Triangle Shirtwaist Factory.
A small fire is sparked in an 8th floor waste cloth bin, filled with over two months of small fabric scraps. It spreads quickly, and a bookkeeper calls to the tenth floor offices to warn employees. There is no way to warn the production line workers on the ninth floor. The first indication of trouble to the floor is not until the fire has already reached it. Though the fire department is notified and arrives soon after the fire breaks out, their tallest ladder only reaches six stories high. Panic breaks out among the workers, who are mostly recently immigrated Jewish and Italian young ladies.
There are two freight elevators, two stairways, and a poorly maintained fire-escape. One stairway is blocked by the fire, and the other is locked, to prevent theft by the workers. The freight elevator operators, Joseph Zito and Gaspar Mortillalo, save over a hundred lives by risking their own.They make three trips each to the ninth floor, until the heat of the fire and the bodies of workers hurling themselves down the elevator shafts warp the cables beyond usability. Terrified workers crowd out onto the fire escape, overloading the already ill-upkept metal. It buckles and twists, breaking away from the building, and dozens of women fall over 100 feet to the unforgiving pavement below. The crushing impact from falling so far leaves them no more than mangled bloody pulps.
No other escape routes remain, and the firefighters’ nets have been torn by the momentum of those they tried to save from falling. A man jumps out of a ninth-floor window. Another appears in a window on the floor above, holding the hand of one of the women. They kiss, and jump to their death. Fifty-nine more workers jump out of the eighth, ninth, and tenth floor windows. Some women hesitate when they appear at the windows; the pervasive flames lick at their hair and skirts long enough to set them ablaze, and they fall to the pavement as shrieking, flailing torches. On the east side of the building, there are over forty bodies piled up. Women on the street are hysterical; men are fainting, and going into frenzied fits. The din of the horror is deafening blocks away.
At the end of the day 129 women and 17 men were dead of blunt force trauma or asphyxiation. Two of the women were only fourteen years old.
The trial of the two owners of the company acquits them of all criminal charges. A later civil trial forces them to pay $75 per victim of the fire. The event drew attention to the lack of safety standards and regulation in factories, and the exploitation of young immigrant women. It was the most deadly disaster in New York City until the destruction of the World Trade Center, and was one of the most poignant focal points of the labor rights movement. 
In February of this year, one hundred years after the disaster, the identities of the last six unknown victims were published.

March 25, 1911. New York, New York. 4:40 PM. 

Triangle Shirtwaist Factory.

A small fire is sparked in an 8th floor waste cloth bin, filled with over two months of small fabric scraps. It spreads quickly, and a bookkeeper calls to the tenth floor offices to warn employees. There is no way to warn the production line workers on the ninth floor. The first indication of trouble to the floor is not until the fire has already reached it. Though the fire department is notified and arrives soon after the fire breaks out, their tallest ladder only reaches six stories high. Panic breaks out among the workers, who are mostly recently immigrated Jewish and Italian young ladies.

There are two freight elevators, two stairways, and a poorly maintained fire-escape. One stairway is blocked by the fire, and the other is locked, to prevent theft by the workers. The freight elevator operators, Joseph Zito and Gaspar Mortillalo, save over a hundred lives by risking their own.They make three trips each to the ninth floor, until the heat of the fire and the bodies of workers hurling themselves down the elevator shafts warp the cables beyond usability. Terrified workers crowd out onto the fire escape, overloading the already ill-upkept metal. It buckles and twists, breaking away from the building, and dozens of women fall over 100 feet to the unforgiving pavement below. The crushing impact from falling so far leaves them no more than mangled bloody pulps.

No other escape routes remain, and the firefighters’ nets have been torn by the momentum of those they tried to save from falling. A man jumps out of a ninth-floor window. Another appears in a window on the floor above, holding the hand of one of the women. They kiss, and jump to their death. Fifty-nine more workers jump out of the eighth, ninth, and tenth floor windows. Some women hesitate when they appear at the windows; the pervasive flames lick at their hair and skirts long enough to set them ablaze, and they fall to the pavement as shrieking, flailing torches. On the east side of the building, there are over forty bodies piled up. Women on the street are hysterical; men are fainting, and going into frenzied fits. The din of the horror is deafening blocks away.

At the end of the day 129 women and 17 men were dead of blunt force trauma or asphyxiation. Two of the women were only fourteen years old.

The trial of the two owners of the company acquits them of all criminal charges. A later civil trial forces them to pay $75 per victim of the fire. The event drew attention to the lack of safety standards and regulation in factories, and the exploitation of young immigrant women. It was the most deadly disaster in New York City until the destruction of the World Trade Center, and was one of the most poignant focal points of the labor rights movement. 

In February of this year, one hundred years after the disaster, the identities of the last six unknown victims were published.