Posts tagged life

Have you got some Irish attired on your wrist? — Asked by Anonymous

Yeaaaahh. Saol amháin on the left wrist, mair é on the right. Basically YOLO in Irish (aka Irish Gaelic). “One life, Live it.”

Got it after going through a solid year of hell, after getting into a massive car wreck 1100 miles from home, getting really fucked-up in the head, having an extremely messed-up summer, and a semester of school where there were days I could hardly get out of bed.

Finally started to get out of that shitty state of being, but would fall back into it every time I didn’t have active commitments that people were holding me to - I drove Bennett to his student teaching assignment (2 hours there and back every morning) but couldn’t bring myself to do more than that at some points.

So I had to remind myself that this life was all I had - there was nothing more, and I had to make the most of it. This life may suck, but I can make it better. Shit will always drag me down, but if I do nothing, I mean nothing. I want to be something after I’m gone.

——————————————————————————-

And, because of course, 18 months later “YOLO” became a *thing*. Fuck whoever made that start.

Of course, I have my brother’s Raven on my left wrist, now, too. I’m going to be getting my triskele and shamrocks touched up (and made less meh) too, and getting a primrose on my right wrist sooner rather than later.

Also in searching for this pic I realized I had a surprising proportion of naked people on my personal blog’s “tattoo” tag.

but why, life?

but why life?

but, why life?

Major Frederick F. Russell is one of the most unknown significant figures in medicine. He was the curator of the Army Medical Museum, but also a significant bacteriologist. 
In the early 1900s, he had a room in the museum converted into his personal laboratory, and after hearing about the questionable results of a typhoid vaccine used during the Boer War, he decided to develop his own, starting from scratch.
Over the course of about 5 years, his research using rabbits and bacterial cultures resulted in a promising new vaccine against typhoid fever. Animal tests went very well. In an interesting optimism about the vaccine, the workers at the Army Medical Museum (almost all of them; there were exhibit workers down to janitors) volunteered to have it tested on themselves. Luckily, it was a success, without any of the problems that the British vaccine had.
In 1910 (or 1908, depending on the source), the vaccine was available for anyone joining the military on a voluntary basis. In 1911 (or 1913, again depending on source), it was made compulsory. 
In the US Civil War, over 80,000 Union soldiers died from typhoid fever or dysentery (which had very similar symptoms and were hard to differentiate before bacteriology; more soldiers are believed to have succumbed to typhoid fever than dysentery). In 1891, typhoid fever deaths were all the way up to 174 per 100,000 people. That resulted in over 130,000 civilian deaths in one year.
Within two years of the introduction of the vaccine (the second year implementing drastic sanitation regulation changes), both branches of the military were free of typhoid fever. United States deaths from typhoid fever in WWI were 80% lower than in non-vaccinated countries (France, Germany, etc…most British soldiers were vaccinated).
Major F.F. Russell eventually went on to do significant work on the Yellow Fever problem, and to win the Public Welfare Medal from the National Academy of Sciences, in 1935.

Major Frederick F. Russell is one of the most unknown significant figures in medicine. He was the curator of the Army Medical Museum, but also a significant bacteriologist. 

In the early 1900s, he had a room in the museum converted into his personal laboratory, and after hearing about the questionable results of a typhoid vaccine used during the Boer War, he decided to develop his own, starting from scratch.

Over the course of about 5 years, his research using rabbits and bacterial cultures resulted in a promising new vaccine against typhoid fever. Animal tests went very well. In an interesting optimism about the vaccine, the workers at the Army Medical Museum (almost all of them; there were exhibit workers down to janitors) volunteered to have it tested on themselves. Luckily, it was a success, without any of the problems that the British vaccine had.

In 1910 (or 1908, depending on the source), the vaccine was available for anyone joining the military on a voluntary basis. In 1911 (or 1913, again depending on source), it was made compulsory. 

In the US Civil War, over 80,000 Union soldiers died from typhoid fever or dysentery (which had very similar symptoms and were hard to differentiate before bacteriology; more soldiers are believed to have succumbed to typhoid fever than dysentery). In 1891, typhoid fever deaths were all the way up to 174 per 100,000 people. That resulted in over 130,000 civilian deaths in one year.

Within two years of the introduction of the vaccine (the second year implementing drastic sanitation regulation changes), both branches of the military were free of typhoid fever. United States deaths from typhoid fever in WWI were 80% lower than in non-vaccinated countries (France, Germany, etc…most British soldiers were vaccinated).

Major F.F. Russell eventually went on to do significant work on the Yellow Fever problem, and to win the Public Welfare Medal from the National Academy of Sciences, in 1935.

 Freyja. Norse goddess of love, beauty, fertility, gold, war, and death. Her tales are very storied and complex.

 Freyja. Norse goddess of love, beauty, fertility, gold, war, and death. Her tales are very storied and complex.

fuckyeahpaleontology:

Illustrations of Natural History by Dru Drury

fuckyeahpaleontology:

Illustrations of Natural History by Dru Drury

fuckyeahpaleontology:

Illustrations of Natural History by Dru Drury.

fuckyeahpaleontology:

Illustrations of Natural History by Dru Drury.

thegildedcentury:

Life, December 29, 1941
I don’t care if God is on our side.  Give me lice any day.  

*shudder* Typhus…always bad news.

thegildedcentury:

Life, December 29, 1941

I don’t care if God is on our side.  Give me lice any day. 

*shudder* Typhus…always bad news.

Hey all!

Got a message wondering where I was. Kinda surprised given that it’s only been about 2 days of lazy inactivity, but there ya go. Anyway, I’m at my parents’ house right now, and it’s a 4-hour drive to get here…I’m goin’ back up north today, so don’t expect much until tonight. 

And thanks anon, kinda weird having someone wonder if I’m alright after such a short time, but I appreciate it nonetheless ;D

In the meantime, have some Black Death humor, courtesy of Natalie Dee: