Posts tagged lice

Exoparasitic arthropoda:
1. Pediculus capitis - Head louse
2. Pediculus pubis - Pubic louse
3. Haematopinus suis - Pig louse
4. Gonoides stylifer - Poultry louse
5. Pulex irritans - "Human Flea" [misnomer - very wide range of hosts]
6. Pulex penetrans - Chigoe Flea/Jigger Flea (also known as a “jigger” - not to be confused with “chiggers”, which are small red mites)

Le Regne Animal Distribue d’Apres son Organisation, pour Servir de Base a l’Histoire Naturelle des Animaux. Georges Cuvier, 1838.

Exoparasitic arthropoda:

1. Pediculus capitis - Head louse

2. Pediculus pubis - Pubic louse

3. Haematopinus suis - Pig louse

4. Gonoides stylifer - Poultry louse

5. Pulex irritans - "Human Flea" [misnomer - very wide range of hosts]

6. Pulex penetrans - Chigoe Flea/Jigger Flea (also known as a “jigger” - not to be confused with “chiggers”, which are small red mites)

Le Regne Animal Distribue d’Apres son Organisation, pour Servir de Base a l’Histoire Naturelle des Animaux. Georges Cuvier, 1838.

ofpaperandponies:

biomedicalephemera:

WWII Body Louse Model
Used to teach field medical personnel how to definitively identify the body louse (as opposed to the pubic louse, scabies mite, or other exoparasites).
From the National Museum of Medicine.

“Every time I come over to you there’s a horrible disease or disgusting surgery or monster…monster…thing on your screen. Why can’t you run some video game blog? Or, like, a cat blog? OUR CATS WOULD MAKE WONDERFUL BLOG SUBJECTS.”

Direct quote from my mate after seeing me zooming in on this picture. :D

ofpaperandponies:

biomedicalephemera:

WWII Body Louse Model

Used to teach field medical personnel how to definitively identify the body louse (as opposed to the pubic louse, scabies mite, or other exoparasites).

From the National Museum of Medicine.

“Every time I come over to you there’s a horrible disease or disgusting surgery or monster…monster…thing on your screen. Why can’t you run some video game blog? Or, like, a cat blog? OUR CATS WOULD MAKE WONDERFUL BLOG SUBJECTS.”

Direct quote from my mate after seeing me zooming in on this picture. :D

WWII Body Louse Model
Used to teach field medical personnel how to definitively identify the body louse (as opposed to the pubic louse, scabies mite, or other exoparasites).
From the National Museum of Medicine.

WWII Body Louse Model

Used to teach field medical personnel how to definitively identify the body louse (as opposed to the pubic louse, scabies mite, or other exoparasites).

From the National Museum of Medicine.

"Ewwww, girls have cooties!" takes on a completely different meaning when you know what "cooties" really are.
Typhus was a horrible disease. In the trenches, epidemic typhus caused a fatality rate between 10 and 40% depending on the outbreak, despite treatment (since antibiotics were not around yet). In WWI and WWII, millions of deaths, most civilian, occurred because of typhus outbreaks. Anti-typhus campaigns were almost completely geared towards the military until after 1945, when serious eradication campaigns began throughout Europe. Notable casualties of typhus - Anne Frank and her sister Margot both succumbed just weeks before Allied troops liberated the camp.
**Don’t confuse typhus with typhoid fever! They occurred in the same areas a lot of the time, but are completely different diseases, with completely different methods of transmission.

"Ewwww, girls have cooties!" takes on a completely different meaning when you know what "cooties" really are.

Typhus was a horrible disease. In the trenches, epidemic typhus caused a fatality rate between 10 and 40% depending on the outbreak, despite treatment (since antibiotics were not around yet). In WWI and WWII, millions of deaths, most civilian, occurred because of typhus outbreaks. Anti-typhus campaigns were almost completely geared towards the military until after 1945, when serious eradication campaigns began throughout Europe. Notable casualties of typhus - Anne Frank and her sister Margot both succumbed just weeks before Allied troops liberated the camp.

**Don’t confuse typhus with typhoid fever! They occurred in the same areas a lot of the time, but are completely different diseases, with completely different methods of transmission.