Posts tagged isle of pines

You know you want some eggplant! We’ve got us lotsa eggplant down here!
Aubergines (Solanum melongena) are a member of the nightshade family (Solanaceae). Other members of this family include tomatoes, potatoes, and tobacco. 
Like the tomato, since the flowers of the aubergines were obviously in the same family as the nightshades, European scholars long considered it highly poisonous. It’s known to be native to India and to have been used in Indian and Chinese cuisine as far back as 544 C.E., though it’s suspected to have been known as a food in India for over 4000 years.
Prospectus of the Tropical Development Company, Founders of the American City and Colony of McKinley Isle of Pines. 1904

You know you want some eggplant! We’ve got us lotsa eggplant down here!

Aubergines (Solanum melongena) are a member of the nightshade family (Solanaceae). Other members of this family include tomatoes, potatoes, and tobacco. 

Like the tomato, since the flowers of the aubergines were obviously in the same family as the nightshades, European scholars long considered it highly poisonous. It’s known to be native to India and to have been used in Indian and Chinese cuisine as far back as 544 C.E., though it’s suspected to have been known as a food in India for over 4000 years.

Prospectus of the Tropical Development Company, Founders of the American City and Colony of McKinley Isle of Pines. 1904

C’mon down to the Isle of Pines! We’ve got cocoa beans!
The Isle of Pines was indefinitely leased to the US in the Platt Amendment, the same amendment that cordoned off the area that Guantanamo Bay is now located in.
However, unlike Guantanamo Bay, the Isle of Pines was reclaimed by the Cuban government when the new Cuban Constitution was drafted in 1940. It’s now called Isla de la Juventud. Despite its extremely good soil for planting and its ideal climate for tropical fruits, the Tropical Development Company never turned a profit from their developments there.
Prospectus of the Tropical Development Company, Founders of the American City and Colony of McKinley Isle of Pines. 1904.

C’mon down to the Isle of Pines! We’ve got cocoa beans!

The Isle of Pines was indefinitely leased to the US in the Platt Amendment, the same amendment that cordoned off the area that Guantanamo Bay is now located in.

However, unlike Guantanamo Bay, the Isle of Pines was reclaimed by the Cuban government when the new Cuban Constitution was drafted in 1940. It’s now called Isla de la Juventud. Despite its extremely good soil for planting and its ideal climate for tropical fruits, the Tropical Development Company never turned a profit from their developments there.

Prospectus of the Tropical Development Company, Founders of the American City and Colony of McKinley Isle of Pines. 1904.