Posts tagged innovators

Veterinary X-Ray Procedure - 1918
Dog having radiographs taken at veterinary hospital in Dijon, France.
Dijon was one of the first hospitals outside of Roentgen’s own labs to integrate x-ray technology as a regular part of diagnostic testing. Though the first x-rays of humans were taken in 1895 and x-ray therapy was used (in the most crude form) since the early 1900s, the diagnostic value of the imaging procedure was not widely regarded in the United States until well into the 1930s.
From National Museum of Medicine Archives.

Veterinary X-Ray Procedure - 1918

Dog having radiographs taken at veterinary hospital in Dijon, France.

Dijon was one of the first hospitals outside of Roentgen’s own labs to integrate x-ray technology as a regular part of diagnostic testing. Though the first x-rays of humans were taken in 1895 and x-ray therapy was used (in the most crude form) since the early 1900s, the diagnostic value of the imaging procedure was not widely regarded in the United States until well into the 1930s.

From National Museum of Medicine Archives.


Injuries of the nose, with marked deformity, are in a measure combated by devices invented for restoring the missing portions of the injured member. Taliacoitus, the distinguished Italian surgeon of the sixteenth century, devised an operation that now bears his name, and consists in fashioning a nose from the fleshy tissues of the arm. The arm is approximated to the head and held in this position by an apparatus or system of bandages for about ten days, at which time it is supposed that it can be severed, and further trimming and paring of the nose is practised. A column is subsequently made from the upper lip.

-Drs. George M. Gould & Walter L. Pyle, in Anomalies and Curiosities of Medicine. 1900.
—————
Using one body part to save or regenerate another is apparently a much older practice than I thought. Attaching a severed foot, ear, or other extremity to the highly-vascularized stomach to regenerate vessels before attempting re-attachment at its proper site is fairly common these days. It’s especially common in re-attachment attempts where the severed body part was detached for an extended period of time that normally would result in an unsuccessful re-attachment.

Injuries of the nose, with marked deformity, are in a measure combated by devices invented for restoring the missing portions of the injured member. Taliacoitus, the distinguished Italian surgeon of the sixteenth century, devised an operation that now bears his name, and consists in fashioning a nose from the fleshy tissues of the arm. The arm is approximated to the head and held in this position by an apparatus or system of bandages for about ten days, at which time it is supposed that it can be severed, and further trimming and paring of the nose is practised. A column is subsequently made from the upper lip.

-Drs. George M. Gould & Walter L. Pyle, in Anomalies and Curiosities of Medicine. 1900.

—————

Using one body part to save or regenerate another is apparently a much older practice than I thought. Attaching a severed foot, ear, or other extremity to the highly-vascularized stomach to regenerate vessels before attempting re-attachment at its proper site is fairly common these days. It’s especially common in re-attachment attempts where the severed body part was detached for an extended period of time that normally would result in an unsuccessful re-attachment.

Dr. Theodatus Garlick: originally a sculptor, he found a passion in creating prosthetic facial parts for patients deformed by injury, tumor, and being born truly hideous (or deformed). He later became a doctor in his own right and was a pioneer in bringing plastic surgeries beyond just function, and creating facial features that often looked better than the patient did before the loss of that part.
Completely unrelated, but he was also one of the pair of men that became the first to artificially propagate trout, smelt, and other fish.

Dr. Theodatus Garlick: originally a sculptor, he found a passion in creating prosthetic facial parts for patients deformed by injury, tumor, and being born truly hideous (or deformed). He later became a doctor in his own right and was a pioneer in bringing plastic surgeries beyond just function, and creating facial features that often looked better than the patient did before the loss of that part.

Completely unrelated, but he was also one of the pair of men that became the first to artificially propagate trout, smelt, and other fish.