Posts tagged innovation

A French device for attempting to use tension and recumbency to correct curvature of the spine. The author of “Orthopraxy" notes that the mechanics of the device are meticulously made and very impressive, but ineffective. To correct lateral curvature of the spine, pressure must be applied to either side of the deformed area, to encourage the body to grow into a more correct form.
Orthopraxy: the Mechanical Treatment of Deformities, Debilities, and Deficiencies of the Human Frame. Henry Heather Bigg, 1877.

A French device for attempting to use tension and recumbency to correct curvature of the spine. The author of “Orthopraxy" notes that the mechanics of the device are meticulously made and very impressive, but ineffective. To correct lateral curvature of the spine, pressure must be applied to either side of the deformed area, to encourage the body to grow into a more correct form.

Orthopraxy: the Mechanical Treatment of Deformities, Debilities, and Deficiencies of the Human Frame. Henry Heather Bigg, 1877.

deformutilation:

Ciuchcia, a 4-month-old orphaned German shepherd, who shows  resilience to an early life of abuse as he chases a kitten with the help  of a specially made wheelchair at a shelter for homeless animals in  Poland.

Orthopaedic devices have always fascinated me…hmmm…think I’ll find some of those awesome Victorian orthopedic thingies that I never bothered to actually post. Nutritional deficiencies and not noticing bone problems early on led to some pretty serious deformities…and some pretty cool-looking inventions that actually worked a lot of the time!

deformutilation:

Ciuchcia, a 4-month-old orphaned German shepherd, who shows resilience to an early life of abuse as he chases a kitten with the help of a specially made wheelchair at a shelter for homeless animals in Poland.

Orthopaedic devices have always fascinated me…hmmm…think I’ll find some of those awesome Victorian orthopedic thingies that I never bothered to actually post. Nutritional deficiencies and not noticing bone problems early on led to some pretty serious deformities…and some pretty cool-looking inventions that actually worked a lot of the time!


The earliest hospital tests trying to transplant or graft skin onto burn victims involved using back and stomach skin from large frogs, but these were sloughed off when the burn granulated in its own healing process. The patients who actually had the burns begin to graft to the frog skin were noted to end up worse than the ones whose body didn’t accept it in the first place. The burns and frog skin would become necrotic and gangrenous and cause septicemia.
In larger hospitals, the option of using skin from cadavers or amputated limbs was sometimes available. However, until Dr. Reverdin came along, grafting was done using both the dermis and epidermis. The vascular region of the prepuce of a boy was noted to be particularly good for grafting use. 
Even when epidermis-only grafting was brought about, it was far from perfect, especially non-autografting (taking skin from one part of someone’s body and grafting it elsewhere on the same body). The case shown here was after several grafts and six months, showing “remarkable healing”…from what I gather, that basically means the person was even beginning to heal, and wasn’t sicker than when they came in.
From Anomalies and Curiosities of Medicine, by Walter L. Pyle and George M. Gould, 1896.

The earliest hospital tests trying to transplant or graft skin onto burn victims involved using back and stomach skin from large frogs, but these were sloughed off when the burn granulated in its own healing process. The patients who actually had the burns begin to graft to the frog skin were noted to end up worse than the ones whose body didn’t accept it in the first place. The burns and frog skin would become necrotic and gangrenous and cause septicemia.

In larger hospitals, the option of using skin from cadavers or amputated limbs was sometimes available. However, until Dr. Reverdin came along, grafting was done using both the dermis and epidermis. The vascular region of the prepuce of a boy was noted to be particularly good for grafting use. 

Even when epidermis-only grafting was brought about, it was far from perfect, especially non-autografting (taking skin from one part of someone’s body and grafting it elsewhere on the same body). The case shown here was after several grafts and six months, showing “remarkable healing”…from what I gather, that basically means the person was even beginning to heal, and wasn’t sicker than when they came in.

From Anomalies and Curiosities of Medicine, by Walter L. Pyle and George M. Gould, 1896.