Posts tagged flickr

The Effects of a Cannonball on the Tibia and Fibula

General Daniel Sickles’ amputated leg bones with similar cannonball to the one that hit him in 1863. Daniel Sickles’ leg was removed after he was struck by a cannonball at the Battle of Gettysburg.

Prior to the Civil War, Gen. Sickles had murdered the son of Francis Scott Key (who was having an affair with his young wife), and had been put on trial, but had been acquitted.

When he was struck during the war, he was, in effect, removed from his post, but he resented that. After being removed, he ran a campaign against both Gen. George Meade and Ulysses S. Grant, which attacked them both for not allowing him back to the field.

After the war, he served as ambassador to Spain, and survived until 1914.

Two Children - One Vaccinated, one Unvaccinated
"Two children in the Municipal Hospital, one unvaccinatedand the other vaccinated on the day of admission - the crust is stillseen upon the leg. This child remained in the hospital with its mother(who was suffering from small - pox) for three weeks, and was dischargedperfectly well. The unvaccinated child admitted with smallpox died.”

Two Children - One Vaccinated, one Unvaccinated

"Two children in the Municipal Hospital, one unvaccinated
and the other vaccinated on the day of admission - the crust is still
seen upon the leg. This child remained in the hospital with its mother
(who was suffering from small - pox) for three weeks, and was discharged
perfectly well. The unvaccinated child admitted with smallpox died.”

Transitional Cell Carcinoma

Child’s arm holding the eye’s vascular tissue

Specimen prepared by Bernardus Siegfried Albinus, ca. 1730. Currently on display in the Anatomy Hall of Museum Boerhaave, in the city of Leiden, The Netherlands.

Photograph by [Astropop], 2009, All Rights Reserved.

Submitted by Thee Naluark.

biomedicalephemera:

Harlequin Ichthyosis
Comprising less than 0.001% of the cases of ichthyosis, Harlequin-type ichthyosis was uniformly fatal in the past. It is an autosomal recessive condition, with both parents having to carry the same mutation of the gene ABCA12. Historically, it was known to be a disease found in first-degree and second-degree consanguineous unions (children from siblings or first cousins), but today it is not one of the major inbreeding-related or Founder effect syndromes.
Harlequin infants are born with thick, plate-like keratin “armor”, often accompanied by ectropion (out-turned eyelids - that’s what causes the blood-like eye appearance). Historically, they would generally die before 14 days of age, due to dehydration, overwhelming infection/sepsis, breathing problems (from the keratin plates restricting inhalation), or related problems. None were known to survive beyond 5 months. These days, some people who are affected by Harlequin-type ichthyosis manage to survive infancy, though the percentage is still barely above half.
The high retention rate and cracking of the plates of keratinous cells leaves the dermis vulnerable to disease and dehydration, but frequent application of Isoretinoin can allow the skin to shed keratin layers faster than it produces them. This allows for a higher level of flexibility and protection (because of no deep fissures in the skin). Currently, there are multiple people who have Harlequin-type ichthyosis treated by Isoretinioin and therapeutic baths who have survived long beyond anything ever seen in the past. Despite the inconvenience their condition poses, some of them present a pretty darn inspirational way of living:
Nusrit “Nelly” Shaheen is 28 (born in 1984) and studied at Hereward College in the UK. She lives a very active lifestyle, and is the oldest living survivor of Harelequin-type ichthyosis.
Ryan Gonzalez is 25, and lives in the United States, where he participates in triathlons and swimming competitions. He uses a different regimen from Nelly in his treatment, where he relies almost exclusively on Isoretinoin ointment. Both require a huge caloric intake to match their skins turnover rate, though.
Today, there are 56 other known survivors of Harlequin-type ichthyosis that are beyond 2 years of age. It may seem like a tiny number, but a 53% survival rate at 2-years-old is certainly better than zero percent! Hopefully the future will hold new therapies for all of the ichthyosis syndromes.
Image:
Harlequin Fetus from 1880 at Museum Vrolik, in Amsterdam, Holland. Photograph by Zzzak.

biomedicalephemera:

Harlequin Ichthyosis

Comprising less than 0.001% of the cases of ichthyosis, Harlequin-type ichthyosis was uniformly fatal in the past. It is an autosomal recessive condition, with both parents having to carry the same mutation of the gene ABCA12. Historically, it was known to be a disease found in first-degree and second-degree consanguineous unions (children from siblings or first cousins), but today it is not one of the major inbreeding-related or Founder effect syndromes.

Harlequin infants are born with thick, plate-like keratin “armor”, often accompanied by ectropion (out-turned eyelids - that’s what causes the blood-like eye appearance). Historically, they would generally die before 14 days of age, due to dehydration, overwhelming infection/sepsis, breathing problems (from the keratin plates restricting inhalation), or related problems. None were known to survive beyond 5 months. These days, some people who are affected by Harlequin-type ichthyosis manage to survive infancy, though the percentage is still barely above half.

The high retention rate and cracking of the plates of keratinous cells leaves the dermis vulnerable to disease and dehydration, but frequent application of Isoretinoin can allow the skin to shed keratin layers faster than it produces them. This allows for a higher level of flexibility and protection (because of no deep fissures in the skin). Currently, there are multiple people who have Harlequin-type ichthyosis treated by Isoretinioin and therapeutic baths who have survived long beyond anything ever seen in the past. Despite the inconvenience their condition poses, some of them present a pretty darn inspirational way of living:

Nusrit “Nelly” Shaheen is 28 (born in 1984) and studied at Hereward College in the UK. She lives a very active lifestyle, and is the oldest living survivor of Harelequin-type ichthyosis.

Ryan Gonzalez is 25, and lives in the United States, where he participates in triathlons and swimming competitions. He uses a different regimen from Nelly in his treatment, where he relies almost exclusively on Isoretinoin ointment. Both require a huge caloric intake to match their skins turnover rate, though.

Today, there are 56 other known survivors of Harlequin-type ichthyosis that are beyond 2 years of age. It may seem like a tiny number, but a 53% survival rate at 2-years-old is certainly better than zero percent! Hopefully the future will hold new therapies for all of the ichthyosis syndromes.

Image:

Harlequin Fetus from 1880 at Museum Vrolik, in Amsterdam, Holland. Photograph by Zzzak.

Because I am both self-aggrandizing (since I find it pretty nifty) and have had a couple different questions about it today - yes, one of the images in the Cracked article 6 Scientific Advances Courtesy of Reckless Self-Endangerment is from my photostream.
No, no one asked me about it. No, I don’t have a problem with that. My images have been used in lessons and presentations and even in a book (will be published in October!), and that’s exactly what I want! I love medical and scientific history, and want to get it out there, and as far as I’m concerned, a minimal amount of credit is all I ask for. A link, or even just a name is fine.
Get the weird world of the past out there! :D

Because I am both self-aggrandizing (since I find it pretty nifty) and have had a couple different questions about it today - yes, one of the images in the Cracked article 6 Scientific Advances Courtesy of Reckless Self-Endangerment is from my photostream.

No, no one asked me about it. No, I don’t have a problem with that. My images have been used in lessons and presentations and even in a book (will be published in October!), and that’s exactly what I want! I love medical and scientific history, and want to get it out there, and as far as I’m concerned, a minimal amount of credit is all I ask for. A link, or even just a name is fine.

Get the weird world of the past out there! :D

Harlequin Ichthyosis
Comprising less than 0.001% of the cases of ichthyosis, Harlequin-type ichthyosis was uniformly fatal in the past. It is an autosomal recessive condition, with both parents having to carry the same mutation of the gene ABCA12. Historically, it was known to be a disease found in first-degree and second-degree consanguineous unions (children from siblings or first cousins), but today it is not one of the major inbreeding-related or Founder effect syndromes.
Harlequin infants are born with thick, plate-like keratin “armor”, often accompanied by ectropion (out-turned eyelids - that’s what causes the blood-like eye appearance). Historically, they would generally die before 14 days of age, due to dehydration, overwhelming infection/sepsis, breathing problems (from the keratin plates restricting inhalation), or related problems. None were known to survive beyond 5 months. These days, some people who are affected by Harlequin-type ichthyosis manage to survive infancy, though the percentage is still barely above half.
The high retention rate and cracking of the plates of keratinous cells leaves the dermis vulnerable to disease and dehydration, but frequent application of Isoretinoin can allow the skin to shed keratin layers faster than it produces them. This allows for a higher level of flexibility and protection (because of no deep fissures in the skin). Currently, there are multiple people who have Harlequin-type ichthyosis treated by Isoretinioin and therapeutic baths who have survived long beyond anything ever seen in the past. Despite the inconvenience their condition poses, some of them present a pretty darn inspirational way of living:
Nusrit “Nelly” Shaheen is 28 (born in 1984) and studied at Hereward College in the UK. She lives a very active lifestyle, and is the oldest living survivor of Harelequin-type ichthyosis.
Ryan Gonzalez is 25, and lives in the United States, where he participates in triathlons and swimming competitions. He uses a different regimen from Nelly in his treatment, where he relies almost exclusively on Isoretinoin ointment. Both require a huge caloric intake to match their skins turnover rate, though.
Today, there are 56 other known survivors of Harlequin-type ichthyosis that are beyond 2 years of age. It may seem like a tiny number, but a 53% survival rate at 2-years-old is certainly better than zero percent! Hopefully the future will hold new therapies for all of the ichthyosis syndromes.
Image:
Harlequin Fetus from 1880 at Museum Vrolik, in Amsterdam, Holland. Photograph by Zzzak.

Harlequin Ichthyosis

Comprising less than 0.001% of the cases of ichthyosis, Harlequin-type ichthyosis was uniformly fatal in the past. It is an autosomal recessive condition, with both parents having to carry the same mutation of the gene ABCA12. Historically, it was known to be a disease found in first-degree and second-degree consanguineous unions (children from siblings or first cousins), but today it is not one of the major inbreeding-related or Founder effect syndromes.

Harlequin infants are born with thick, plate-like keratin “armor”, often accompanied by ectropion (out-turned eyelids - that’s what causes the blood-like eye appearance). Historically, they would generally die before 14 days of age, due to dehydration, overwhelming infection/sepsis, breathing problems (from the keratin plates restricting inhalation), or related problems. None were known to survive beyond 5 months. These days, some people who are affected by Harlequin-type ichthyosis manage to survive infancy, though the percentage is still barely above half.

The high retention rate and cracking of the plates of keratinous cells leaves the dermis vulnerable to disease and dehydration, but frequent application of Isoretinoin can allow the skin to shed keratin layers faster than it produces them. This allows for a higher level of flexibility and protection (because of no deep fissures in the skin). Currently, there are multiple people who have Harlequin-type ichthyosis treated by Isoretinioin and therapeutic baths who have survived long beyond anything ever seen in the past. Despite the inconvenience their condition poses, some of them present a pretty darn inspirational way of living:

Nusrit “Nelly” Shaheen is 28 (born in 1984) and studied at Hereward College in the UK. She lives a very active lifestyle, and is the oldest living survivor of Harelequin-type ichthyosis.

Ryan Gonzalez is 25, and lives in the United States, where he participates in triathlons and swimming competitions. He uses a different regimen from Nelly in his treatment, where he relies almost exclusively on Isoretinoin ointment. Both require a huge caloric intake to match their skins turnover rate, though.

Today, there are 56 other known survivors of Harlequin-type ichthyosis that are beyond 2 years of age. It may seem like a tiny number, but a 53% survival rate at 2-years-old is certainly better than zero percent! Hopefully the future will hold new therapies for all of the ichthyosis syndromes.

Image:

Harlequin Fetus from 1880 at Museum Vrolik, in Amsterdam, Holland. Photograph by Zzzak.

Danse Macabre - Danza de la Muerte - Totentanz

"The Dance of Death

What’s up, chickadees? I got distracted from my schoolwork today and spent thoroughly too much time editing and posting Danse Macabre illustrations on the Flickr Photostream. Check them out, use them, re-post them, whatever you want. And you two guys who requested more “Dance of Death” stuff had better appreciate the heck out of this (and disregard that I was already preparing it when you asked :P)!

Images:

Top"The Dangers of the Ocean o’er/Death wrecks the Sailors on the Shore" - "The Shipwreck" - 1815
Center Left
: “The Bones of All Mankind” - 1753
Center Right
: “The Monk” - 1753
Bottom Left
: “The Child” - 1423 (re-print from 1903)
Bottom Center
: Frontispiece to “Magnus in Ortu; Maximus in Meridie; Major in Occasu”, depicting death and life [infant angel] painting the heavens and earth. - 1727 
Bottom Right:
“The Infant” - 1753

I love those wheelchairs in your photos on Flickr! I may use them in an upcoming powerpoint presentation, if that's ok with you? How should I credit you? Great blog, by the way. I love the skeletons and bugs, especially! :) — Asked by Anonymous

Thanks!

Basically everything I post on that stream (but especially that photoset) is CC -BY-3.0 with attribution waived. I mean, it’s sort of slimy if you go and say “I WENT THROUGH HELL AND BRIMSTONE TO FIND THESE GRAPHICS ON MY OWN” and use them, but really? Don’t have much of a problem with it. You’re just a bit of a nutter if you do that.

So, if you’re required to attribute everything, come off anon (or message me on Flickr) and I can give you the original source and the attribution info for it.

One of many questionable devices on the photostream.
Right out of a mad scientist’s laboratory.

One of many questionable devices on the photostream.

Right out of a mad scientist’s laboratory.

1. Posted a bunch of advertisements/medical devices/medical-related stuff on the Flickr stream. It’s stuff I really like but will likely not use here, but I went through the effort to find it and make it usable with minimal editing (if one were so inclined), so I don’t want to let it go to waste. All is listed in Creative Commons. Feel free to use and abuse.

2. Queue Functionality with Multiple Posts Listed: 33% (3/9 times) It’s only this blog, too. My other blogs work fine. It’s persisted through multiple themes so that takes away the theory that tech support gave me. Oh well.

Ephemeral Scraps’ photostream on Flickr.

Uploaded a set of parrots from 1840. I think pretty much every single scientific name is wrong, so find the alternative if you use the image.

Ephemeral Scraps’ photostream on Flickr.

Uploaded a set of parrots from 1840. I think pretty much every single scientific name is wrong, so find the alternative if you use the image.

Hey! You spending tonight at home/recovering from a wild party/lollygagging about all day? Here’s something to take a few minutes of your time!

The new layout isn’t up yet, but I have quite a few images on my Flickr photostream already - both natural history and medical.

Check out the Erpétologie générale album. I can never seem to find enough uses for the illustrations over on the blog, but they are fantastic. Frogs and gators and turtles and lizards!

The German orthopedics and the herpetology books aren’t annotated yet, but the references for everything are already loaded.