Posts tagged filarial worms

Elephantiasis of the leg, from a 27-year-old man from Buffalo, NY. Elephantiasis is usually characterized by lymphatic derangement caused by filarial worms or parasitic roundworms that are endemic to the tropics. The patient had never been to any region where these parasites were, so doctors didn’t know the origin of his elephantiasis.
Leg amputated in 1897. Patient made full and uneventful recovery after amputation, with continued lymphatic symptoms causing only mild edema in right leg.

Elephantiasis of the leg, from a 27-year-old man from Buffalo, NY. Elephantiasis is usually characterized by lymphatic derangement caused by filarial worms or parasitic roundworms that are endemic to the tropics. The patient had never been to any region where these parasites were, so doctors didn’t know the origin of his elephantiasis.

Leg amputated in 1897. Patient made full and uneventful recovery after amputation, with continued lymphatic symptoms causing only mild edema in right leg.

Extreme elephantiasis of the labia due to filarial worms- filariasis is still not terribly uncommon in tropical areas, and most books of tropical medicine and medical oddities include the awful cases of testicular filariasis sometimes found. One of the awful things about this disease is how it messes up the lymph system permanently…even when the filarial worms are eliminated, the lymph system still doesn’t drain like it should anymore. Edema and elephantiasis consequently won’t go down naturally, and sometimes requires surgical intervention. But the messed up lymph system will still persist, and sometimes elephantiasis can recur in other parts of the body.
From Anomalies and Curiosities of Medicine, by Walter L. Pyle and George M. Gould, 1896.

Extreme elephantiasis of the labia due to filarial worms- filariasis is still not terribly uncommon in tropical areas, and most books of tropical medicine and medical oddities include the awful cases of testicular filariasis sometimes found. One of the awful things about this disease is how it messes up the lymph system¬†permanently…even when the filarial worms are eliminated, the lymph system still doesn’t drain like it should anymore. Edema and elephantiasis consequently won’t go down naturally, and sometimes requires surgical intervention. But the messed up lymph system will still persist, and sometimes elephantiasis can recur in other parts of the body.

From Anomalies and Curiosities of Medicine, by Walter L. Pyle and George M. Gould, 1896.