Posts tagged equine

This is a hinny. It is the combination of a male horse (stallion) and a female donkey (jenny or jennet). Like its counterpart, the mule (horse mare/donkey male), hinnies are infertile.
That is why this one has a vendetta against you and your personal choices in fashion.

This is a hinny. It is the combination of a male horse (stallion) and a female donkey (jenny or jennet). Like its counterpart, the mule (horse mare/donkey male), hinnies are infertile.

That is why this one has a vendetta against you and your personal choices in fashion.

weavercat:

lostbeasts:

biomedicalephemera:

“Comparison of ancestral and existing horse”

The lower figure is a model of a full-sized Eohippus, placed beneath the skull of a modern horse, to show that the skull of the modern horse is larger than the entire body of its ancestor.

Despite being one of the most commonly cited “facts” in basic paleontology (as found in many elementary school science texts), this size comparison is actually incorrect. Geologist Henry Fairfield Osborn distributed (largely correct, aside from this point) educational pamphlets citing the size of Eohippus to be comparable to a “small fox terrier” to schoolhouses, to promote the science of paleontology, around the turn of the century.
His pamphlets reached so far and wide that the “fact” still persists to this day in many textbooks. Eohippus was about twice the size of a fox terrier, which is about 2.5 times the size of a modern horse skull.
Origin and History of the Horse. Address before the New York Farmers Metropolitan Club, 1905.

i much prefer the name Eohippus to Hyracotherium

Well, I prefer Hyracotherium as it is more closely related to paleotheres than ‘Eophippus’. Also, in college text-books, the freaking fox-terrier bit is still cited. Also, those feet look.. odd. Maybe it’s just me but they don’t look quite right. I thought the fifth toes on the forelegs were up ‘higher’ on the foot.

The fifth toes weren’t higher up on the foot until Mesohippus, about 15 million years later. Hyracotherium was very wolf-like in its feet, though you can see from its leg structure that it had already begun the transition into a true prey animal, built for running long distances.
Re: those college texts: It’s hard to criticize them currently, as a LARGE fox terrier can reach up to 15 inches, which would have been the size of a small "Eohippus". However, when the pamphlet was written by Osborn, the standard size of a fox terrier was 13” tall - a small fox terrier would have been less than 8” at its withers, and was much smaller than the horse he purports it to represent.

weavercat:

lostbeasts:

biomedicalephemera:

“Comparison of ancestral and existing horse”

The lower figure is a model of a full-sized Eohippus, placed beneath the skull of a modern horse, to show that the skull of the modern horse is larger than the entire body of its ancestor.

Despite being one of the most commonly cited “facts” in basic paleontology (as found in many elementary school science texts), this size comparison is actually incorrect. Geologist Henry Fairfield Osborn distributed (largely correct, aside from this point) educational pamphlets citing the size of Eohippus to be comparable to a “small fox terrier” to schoolhouses, to promote the science of paleontology, around the turn of the century.

His pamphlets reached so far and wide that the “fact” still persists to this day in many textbooks. Eohippus was about twice the size of a fox terrier, which is about 2.5 times the size of a modern horse skull.

Origin and History of the Horse. Address before the New York Farmers Metropolitan Club, 1905.

i much prefer the name Eohippus to Hyracotherium

Well, I prefer Hyracotherium as it is more closely related to paleotheres than ‘Eophippus’. Also, in college text-books, the freaking fox-terrier bit is still cited. Also, those feet look.. odd. Maybe it’s just me but they don’t look quite right. I thought the fifth toes on the forelegs were up ‘higher’ on the foot.

The fifth toes weren’t higher up on the foot until Mesohippus, about 15 million years later. Hyracotherium was very wolf-like in its feet, though you can see from its leg structure that it had already begun the transition into a true prey animal, built for running long distances.

Re: those college texts: It’s hard to criticize them currently, as a LARGE fox terrier can reach up to 15 inches, which would have been the size of a small "Eohippus". However, when the pamphlet was written by Osborn, the standard size of a fox terrier was 13” tall - a small fox terrier would have been less than 8” at its withers, and was much smaller than the horse he purports it to represent.

"Comparison of ancestral and existing horse"

The lower figure is a model of a full-sized Eohippus, placed beneath the skull of a modern horse, to show that the skull of the modern horse is larger than the entire body of its ancestor.

Despite being one of the most commonly cited “facts” in basic paleontology (as found in many elementary school science texts), this size comparison is actually incorrect. Geologist Henry Fairfield Osborn distributed (largely correct, aside from this point) educational pamphlets citing the size of Eohippus to be comparable to a “small fox terrier” to schoolhouses, to promote the science of paleontology, around the turn of the century.
His pamphlets reached so far and wide that the “fact” still persists to this day in many textbooks. Eohippus was about twice the size of a fox terrier, which is about 2.5 times the size of a modern horse skull.
Origin and History of the Horse. Address before the New York Farmers Metropolitan Club, 1905.

"Comparison of ancestral and existing horse"

The lower figure is a model of a full-sized Eohippus, placed beneath the skull of a modern horse, to show that the skull of the modern horse is larger than the entire body of its ancestor.

Despite being one of the most commonly cited “facts” in basic paleontology (as found in many elementary school science texts), this size comparison is actually incorrect. Geologist Henry Fairfield Osborn distributed (largely correct, aside from this point) educational pamphlets citing the size of Eohippus to be comparable to a “small fox terrier” to schoolhouses, to promote the science of paleontology, around the turn of the century.

His pamphlets reached so far and wide that the “fact” still persists to this day in many textbooks. Eohippus was about twice the size of a fox terrier, which is about 2.5 times the size of a modern horse skull.

Origin and History of the Horse. Address before the New York Farmers Metropolitan Club, 1905.

Overshot fetlock (“knuckling over”) in the horse
"Knuckling over", or upright fetlock joints in the horse, is usually caused by a congenital tendon deformity, where the tendons are too short. This causes considerable pain and weakness in otherwise well-conformed horses if corrective surgery is not undertaken soon after birth.
The New Book of the Horse. Charles Richardson, 1913.

Overshot fetlock (“knuckling over”) in the horse

"Knuckling over", or upright fetlock joints in the horse, is usually caused by a congenital tendon deformity, where the tendons are too short. This causes considerable pain and weakness in otherwise well-conformed horses if corrective surgery is not undertaken soon after birth.

The New Book of the Horse. Charles Richardson, 1913.

biomedicalephemera:

Przewalski’s Horse - Equus prjevalskii [disputed, generally accepted as Equus ferus przewalskii]
The Przewalski’s horse, or takhi, is the only “true” wild horse remaining in the world, and is distinct from Equus ferus caballus, the domesticated horse. Though Przewalski’s horses and domesticated horses can interbreed and produce fertile offspring, the Przewalski’s horse has an extra pair of chromosomes, distinctive dentition, and a convex profile (“Roman nose”) uncommon in most breeds of domestic horse. The subspecies is believed to have diverged from Equus ferus ferus around 125,000 years ago, but the two groups interbred for at least 25,000 years before true geographical isolation began.
The discovery of the takhi in the Mongolian steppes in 1881 was followed by the collection of entire herds through hunting and rounding up to be kept in zoos. The last wild herd was spotted in 1967, and the last individual was spotted in 1969. The most genetically diverse captive herd (living in Askania-Nova in Ukraine) was slaughtered by former German soldiers in the late 1940s for unknown reasons.
Fortunately for conservation efforts, the very few individuals remaining in the world by 1977, when the species was declared “Extinct in the Wild”, proved to be very healthy, at least in terms of genetic vitality. Careful breeding programs started by the Foundation for the Preservation and Protection of the Przewalski’s Horse (FPPPH) in that same year ensured that the genetic diversity remained as strong as possible, given the tiny population. Twelve to fifteen individuals managed to produce small herds in several zoos and preserves, and the population grew at a steady pace for a decade and a half, before the first individuals were re-introduced to the wild, in 1992. Despite
After that first herd of 16 genetically distinct individuals from several zoos was introduced into the Gobi Desert, and successfully formed a herd with numerous healthy foals, Przewalski’s horse was re-classified from “Extinct in the Wild” to “Critically Endangered”. As of 2008, three stable-and-growing herds exist in the wild, in Mongolia and the prohibited-access zone around Chernobyl, Ukraine (a surprisingly good wildlife preserve!). They’re currently considered “Endangered”, and their population outlook is positive, with genetic diversity programs continuing in both zoos and the wild herds.
Proceedings of the Zoological Society of London. 1902.

biomedicalephemera:

Przewalski’s Horse - Equus prjevalskii [disputed, generally accepted as Equus ferus przewalskii]

The Przewalski’s horse, or takhi, is the only “true” wild horse remaining in the world, and is distinct from Equus ferus caballus, the domesticated horse. Though Przewalski’s horses and domesticated horses can interbreed and produce fertile offspring, the Przewalski’s horse has an extra pair of chromosomes, distinctive dentition, and a convex profile (“Roman nose”) uncommon in most breeds of domestic horse. The subspecies is believed to have diverged from Equus ferus ferus around 125,000 years ago, but the two groups interbred for at least 25,000 years before true geographical isolation began.

The discovery of the takhi in the Mongolian steppes in 1881 was followed by the collection of entire herds through hunting and rounding up to be kept in zoos. The last wild herd was spotted in 1967, and the last individual was spotted in 1969. The most genetically diverse captive herd (living in Askania-Nova in Ukraine) was slaughtered by former German soldiers in the late 1940s for unknown reasons.

Fortunately for conservation efforts, the very few individuals remaining in the world by 1977, when the species was declared “Extinct in the Wild”, proved to be very healthy, at least in terms of genetic vitality. Careful breeding programs started by the Foundation for the Preservation and Protection of the Przewalski’s Horse (FPPPH) in that same year ensured that the genetic diversity remained as strong as possible, given the tiny population. Twelve to fifteen individuals managed to produce small herds in several zoos and preserves, and the population grew at a steady pace for a decade and a half, before the first individuals were re-introduced to the wild, in 1992. Despite

After that first herd of 16 genetically distinct individuals from several zoos was introduced into the Gobi Desert, and successfully formed a herd with numerous healthy foals, Przewalski’s horse was re-classified from “Extinct in the Wild” to “Critically Endangered”. As of 2008, three stable-and-growing herds exist in the wild, in Mongolia and the prohibited-access zone around Chernobyl, Ukraine (a surprisingly good wildlife preserve!). They’re currently considered “Endangered”, and their population outlook is positive, with genetic diversity programs continuing in both zoos and the wild herds.

Proceedings of the Zoological Society of London. 1902.

unnaturalist:

Articulated model of a horse hoof, circa 1840

unnaturalist:

Articulated model of a horse hoof, circa 1840

Grant’s Zebra - Equus quagga boehmi
Grant’s zebra is the smallest of the six plains zebra species, and has more vertical stripes than other zebras. They’re sorta dumpy-looking compared to other zebras, too. Short and stout with skinny legs. They’re not endangered, but the civil wars in their habitats (such as Somalia, Rwanda, Ethiopia, and Uganda) have slashed their population drastically. Still, they’re doing better than most zebra species.
Proceedings of the Zoological Society of London. 1883.

Grant’s Zebra - Equus quagga boehmi

Grant’s zebra is the smallest of the six plains zebra species, and has more vertical stripes than other zebras. They’re sorta dumpy-looking compared to other zebras, too. Short and stout with skinny legs. They’re not endangered, but the civil wars in their habitats (such as Somalia, Rwanda, Ethiopia, and Uganda) have slashed their population drastically. Still, they’re doing better than most zebra species.

Proceedings of the Zoological Society of London. 1883.

Top: The leg and foot of an elephant (left) as compared to the leg structure of a horse.

Bottom: The basic anatomy of the elephant in motion.

Despite having superficial similarities to the horse leg, the elephant evolved very differently. Where the horse lost its side toes and developed a much larger nail on the middle toe to form its hoof, the elephant still has all five digits present, albeit encased in a tough and fleshy sole. If you look at an elephant’s feet, you can still see evidence of their five digits, in the form of fingernails on the outside of the foot-pad.

Sketches of the Natural History of Ceylon with Narratives and Anecdotes. Sir J. Emerson Tennent, 1861.

The horse, and how to tell its age by tooth wear.
The Animal Kingdom. Georges Cuvier, 1834.

The horse, and how to tell its age by tooth wear.

The Animal Kingdom. Georges Cuvier, 1834.

Anatomia del Cavallo. Carlo Ruini, 1618. Venice.

Anatomia del Cavallo. Carlo Ruini, 1618. Venice.

Horse teeth have a tendency to become infected and inflamed if they aren’t routinely floated, especially the pre-molars. When that happens, it causes issues with the horse’s ability to grind food, which affects its ability to digest food. 
A Course in Surgical Operations for Veterinary Students and Practitioners. W. Pfeiffer and W.L. Williams, 1900.

Horse teeth have a tendency to become infected and inflamed if they aren’t routinely floated, especially the pre-molars. When that happens, it causes issues with the horse’s ability to grind food, which affects its ability to digest food. 

A Course in Surgical Operations for Veterinary Students and Practitioners. W. Pfeiffer and W.L. Williams, 1900.

A Compend of Equine Anatomy and Physiology by William R. Ballou, 1907.

A Compend of Equine Anatomy and Physiology by William R. Ballou, 1907.

A Course in Surgical Operations for Veterinary Students and Practitioners. W. Pfeiffer and W.L. Williams, 1900.

A Course in Surgical Operations for Veterinary Students and Practitioners. W. Pfeiffer and W.L. Williams, 1900.

From The Points of the Horse: a familiar treatise on equine conformation. By Horace Hayes, 1893.

From The Points of the Horse: a familiar treatise on equine conformation. By Horace Hayes, 1893.

From The Points of the Horse: a familiar treatise on equine conformation. By Horace Hayes, 1893.

From The Points of the Horse: a familiar treatise on equine conformation. By Horace Hayes, 1893.