Posts tagged dogs

biomedicalephemera:

Veterinary X-Ray Procedure - 1918
Dog having radiographs taken at veterinary hospital in Dijon, France.
Dijon was one of the first hospitals outside of Roentgen’s own labs to integrate x-ray technology as a regular part of diagnostic testing. Though the first x-rays of humans were taken in 1895 and x-ray therapy was used (in the most crude form) since the early 1900s, the diagnostic value of the imaging procedure was not widely regarded in the United States until well into the 1930s.
From National Museum of Medicine Archives.

biomedicalephemera:

Veterinary X-Ray Procedure - 1918

Dog having radiographs taken at veterinary hospital in Dijon, France.

Dijon was one of the first hospitals outside of Roentgen’s own labs to integrate x-ray technology as a regular part of diagnostic testing. Though the first x-rays of humans were taken in 1895 and x-ray therapy was used (in the most crude form) since the early 1900s, the diagnostic value of the imaging procedure was not widely regarded in the United States until well into the 1930s.

From National Museum of Medicine Archives.

May I hear about some sort of canine please? Your choice of dog as long as it's a dog — Asked by fletchinder

Woof. Woof woof woof. Woof woof.

"All his life he tried to be a good person. Many times, however, he failed.
For after all, he was only human. He wasn’t a dog.” - Charles M. Schultz

There are over 400 million dogs in the world today. Most breeds are only a few hundred years old, many even younger than that. Some, however, derive from the most ancient stock. There are several primary “types” that gave rise to our current breeds. Today, the Fédération Cynologique Internationale classifies all breeds into ten groups.

  1. Sheepdogs and Cattle Dogs
  2. Pinschers and Schnauzers, Molossoids and Swiss Mountain Dogs
  3. Terriers
  4. Dachshunds
  5. Spitz and Primitive Types
  6. Scenthounds
  7. Pointers and Setters
  8. Retrievers, Flushing Dogs and Water Dogs
  9. Companion and Toy Dogs
  10. Sighthounds

The Book of Dogs: An Intimate Study of Mankind’s Best Friend. Ernest Harold Baynes and Louis Agassiz Fuertes for the National Geographic Society, 1919.

Is there a reason why dogs and cats and other small mammals kept as pets seem to enjoy placing themselves in confined areas like boxes and shoes? Is it a learned trait or could it innate and possibly offered some sort of benefit in the wild? Thanks! — Asked by iamartinghere

Caves are safety! When your surroundings are small and confined, you know you can defend the entrance and keep an eye on your surroundings. Nothing ambushes you from behind when it’s a closed space!

For most pets, it’s just a matter of comfort, but it can also be a fear response (in an unfamiliar environment or during disruption or loud noises), or a bizarre obsession (see: Maru). In addition, most of the smaller animals we keep as pets are burrowers - they live underground or in rock crevices, and like things that mimic their natural habitat.

Maru is boxes.

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ETA: Unfucked reminded me of scale errors (as found in infants and toddlers) possibly being an aspect of this - it’s obviously not the case when it’s a self-protective thing, but Maru’s tiniest boxes and his love of jumping out of them makes me think that it might be an aspect in some animals.

Pit Bull Attack! - Skeptoid investigates Breed-Specific Legislation

ofpaperandponies:

Perhaps the most horrifying story to hear on the news is a case of a child being killed by a pack of dogs, hardly anything can incite a more emotional response. We’re quick to vilify the dogs; perhaps justifiably so, perhaps not. In the United States, it seems that more often than not, the dogs involved in such attacks are pit bulls. Legislation is quick to address highly emotional issues, and many states now have various bans and limitations on pit bulls. Today we’re going to turn our skeptical eye onto the popular belief that pit bulls are truly as dangerous as their reputation suggests.

Fully-sourced, concise, neutral-standpoint investigation claims of pit bulls as a “dangerous breed”.

Excellent take on the REAL science related to dangerous dog legislation.

(spoiler alert: don’t mess with Chow Chows, owner and environment affect way more than breed, and neuter your damn dog)

Historically, dogs have been a partner to humankind far more than a simple house-pet or decorative “accessory”, as some have become today. But even when dogs were kept by humans and expected to attack on sight (for example, out on the frontier, protective and aggressive dogs were essential to protecting both herd and home for many people), there were some dogs that were considered to be “too dangerous” for “city life”.

Among the dogs considered to be inappropriate in Victorian London, the large molossian type (bulldogs, mastiffs, and other heavy-built defenders) was considered almost taboo in many circles. Ironically, the posh and fashionable French Bulldog (Frenchie), which is naturally fairly defensive of its owner (tending to bite others), was developed from the molossian type, and is considered to be significantly more aggressive than the larger breeds, such as Mastiffs.


From Cheselden’s book on skeletal structures.

From Cheselden’s book on skeletal structures.

Striped hyena, black-backed jackal, and wolf.
New Illustrated Natural History of the World, Ernest Protheroe, 1910.

Striped hyena, black-backed jackal, and wolf.

New Illustrated Natural History of the World, Ernest Protheroe, 1910.

Jackal, Wolf, Deerhound, and Wolfhound.
Zoology. Frederick Werne, mid-late 1800s.

Jackal, Wolf, Deerhound, and Wolfhound.

Zoology. Frederick Werne, mid-late 1800s.

I may or may not have gotten distracted by actually organizing my files of books for a change (21 GB…yeah, there’s a LOT in there…). Organized it a while ago, but it was in a sad state of affairs…anyway! Posting some requests tonight, some tomorrow morning, and if you still have any animals/invertebrates etc you want to see, send them here.
Foxes, wolves, coyotes, and jackals. Wild dogs!
From Quadrupeds: What they are and where found; A Book of Zoology for Boys. By Captain Mayne Reid, 1870.

I may or may not have gotten distracted by actually organizing my files of books for a change (21 GB…yeah, there’s a LOT in there…). Organized it a while ago, but it was in a sad state of affairs…anyway! Posting some requests tonight, some tomorrow morning, and if you still have any animals/invertebrates etc you want to see, send them here.

Foxes, wolves, coyotes, and jackals. Wild dogs!

From Quadrupeds: What they are and where found; A Book of Zoology for Boys. By Captain Mayne Reid, 1870.