Posts tagged daguerrotype

cabbagingcove:

1890 photograph of Dr. Hillard Holm.
He was one of the first doctors to lead a successful separation of conjoined twins, and the first doctor in Minnesota to do so. 
Plus, he’s pretty cute.

cabbagingcove:

1890 photograph of Dr. Hillard Holm.

He was one of the first doctors to lead a successful separation of conjoined twins, and the first doctor in Minnesota to do so. 

Plus, he’s pretty cute.

ofpaperandponies:

Daguerrotype of a man in a traditional “last sleep” pose, as if he fell asleep reading the newspaper. Circa 1860s.

Don’t know if I posted this guy before. I like him, since I haven’t seen any other postmortems (that I remember) with a newspaper in the photo. Books, yes, newspapers, not so much.

ofpaperandponies:

Daguerrotype of a man in a traditional “last sleep” pose, as if he fell asleep reading the newspaper. Circa 1860s.

Don’t know if I posted this guy before. I like him, since I haven’t seen any other postmortems (that I remember) with a newspaper in the photo. Books, yes, newspapers, not so much.

tuesday-johnson:

ca. 1845, “The Branded Hand of Captain Jonathan Walker”,  Southworth and Hawes 
The inscription on the back of the case reads:

This Daguerreotype was taken by Southworth Aug. 1845 it is a copy of  Captain Jonathan Walker’s hand as branded by the U.S. Marshall of the  Dist. of Florida for having helped 7 men to obtain ‘Life Liberty, and  Happiness.’…

The brand is “S.S.” for “Slave Stealer”. This photo inspired the famous engraving “The Branded Hand”.
via the Daguerreian Society, from the Massachusetts Historical Society

It’s not cut off, but still quite interesting. 
Branding has been used for ages to identify both humans (mostly criminals throughout history, but in the 18th and 19th century, slaves were far more commonly branded) and animals. Though PIT chips have superseded its use in almost all tracked species, the tortoises on the Galapagos islands were branded on the rear of their shell in 2003. They couldn’t feel it (the outer tortoise shell is the same material that fingernails and hair is), and it provided a permanent and life-long identification method.

tuesday-johnson:

ca. 1845, “The Branded Hand of Captain Jonathan Walker”, Southworth and Hawes

The inscription on the back of the case reads:

This Daguerreotype was taken by Southworth Aug. 1845 it is a copy of Captain Jonathan Walker’s hand as branded by the U.S. Marshall of the Dist. of Florida for having helped 7 men to obtain ‘Life Liberty, and Happiness.’…

The brand is “S.S.” for “Slave Stealer”. This photo inspired the famous engraving “The Branded Hand”.

via the Daguerreian Society, from the Massachusetts Historical Society

It’s not cut off, but still quite interesting. 

Branding has been used for ages to identify both humans (mostly criminals throughout history, but in the 18th and 19th century, slaves were far more commonly branded) and animals.
Though PIT chips have superseded its use in almost all tracked species, the tortoises on the Galapagos islands were branded on the rear of their shell in 2003. They couldn’t feel it (the outer tortoise shell is the same material that fingernails and hair is), and it provided a permanent and life-long identification method.

Postmortem photograph of a boy named James Swan. Traditional beautified “Last Sleep” pose on a blank cabinet card. Probably from between 1885-1900.

Postmortem photograph of a boy named James Swan. Traditional beautified “Last Sleep” pose on a blank cabinet card. Probably from between 1885-1900.

ofpaperandponies:

That light blue background is actually an additional border that the studio attached the photograph to. Attaching the photograph to an additional background was not uncommon (though I’ve never seen this color used before) in the era of daguerrotypes, ambrotypes, and tintypes (the hard images). Once photography advanced to cartes-de-visite and cabinet cards being the norm, the fact that they were paper prints eliminated the need for an additional border, made from a separate sheet of paper.
The pose is typical of the 1840s-late 1880s, where the body was made to appear as if only asleep, and was a denial of death in many photographs. The Burns Archive has three books of “Sleeping Beauty” from during and around this time that have some very unsettling images in them.

ofpaperandponies:

That light blue background is actually an additional border that the studio attached the photograph to. Attaching the photograph to an additional background was not uncommon (though I’ve never seen this color used before) in the era of daguerrotypes, ambrotypes, and tintypes (the hard images). Once photography advanced to cartes-de-visite and cabinet cards being the norm, the fact that they were paper prints eliminated the need for an additional border, made from a separate sheet of paper.

The pose is typical of the 1840s-late 1880s, where the body was made to appear as if only asleep, and was a denial of death in many photographs. The Burns Archive has three books of “Sleeping Beauty” from during and around this time that have some very unsettling images in them.