Posts tagged butterfly pea

Clitoria ternatea - Butterfly pea, Aparajita, Pigeon-wings, Blue pea vine
Flora de Filipinas Atlas II. Francisco Manuel Blanco, 1880-1883.

Clitoria ternatea - Butterfly pea, Aparajita, Pigeon-wings, Blue pea vine

Flora de Filipinas Atlas II. Francisco Manuel Blanco, 1880-1883.

ofpaperandponies:

Clitoria mariana, the butterfly pea species also known as “Atlantic Pigeonwings”. Classified and named in 1818.
People might not associate the scientific community with the sexually romantic type, but they certainly have a moment here and there that shows the public what they’re made of. The genus Clitoria is, of course, named after its shape resembling that of the female pudenda. But I like this particular species the best; at the very least it’s the prettiest one.
But! Way back in 1818, as the story goes, a young classifying naturalist who was working on the East Coast, had found this new species and placed it within the genus then known as Clitorius - basically the same as today. Having been closely courting a lady that he wished to marry (some might say spending a few too many hours alone in the garden with her), he decided to name this new species of butterfly pea in honor of her beauty.
Sadly, I have no idea what happened after that, only that they were not married at the time he named the flower, and that he knew full well he was, in essence, naming a flower after his girlfriend’s pudenda (the outer lady-parts).
Pretty hot love story, if you ask me.

ofpaperandponies:

Clitoria mariana, the butterfly pea species also known as “Atlantic Pigeonwings”. Classified and named in 1818.

People might not associate the scientific community with the sexually romantic type, but they certainly have a moment here and there that shows the public what they’re made of. The genus Clitoria is, of course, named after its shape resembling that of the female pudenda. But I like this particular species the best; at the very least it’s the prettiest one.

But! Way back in 1818, as the story goes, a young classifying naturalist who was working on the East Coast, had found this new species and placed it within the genus then known as Clitorius - basically the same as today. Having been closely courting a lady that he wished to marry (some might say spending a few too many hours alone in the garden with her), he decided to name this new species of butterfly pea in honor of her beauty.

Sadly, I have no idea what happened after that, only that they were not married at the time he named the flower, and that he knew full well he was, in essence, naming a flower after his girlfriend’s pudenda (the outer lady-parts).

Pretty hot love story, if you ask me.