Posts tagged brazil

Male Reproductive Organ - Lachesis rhombeata (now Lachesis muta rhombeata)

Like other Squamates (snakes and lizards), the male Atlantic forest bushmaster (Lachesis muta rhombeata) possesses a reproductive organ known as the hemipene, or hemipenis. It has two heads, and is generally heavily spiked on both heads. The organ retracts into the tail of the animal when it’s not mating, and is one of the defining characteristics of the order Squamata.

Recuil de Planche coloriees d’Animaux du Bresil, publie par S. A. S. le Prince Maximilien de Wied-Neuwied. 1822.

biomedicalephemera:

“The mussurama [mussurana] swallowing the jararaca, or fer-de-lance, after having just killed it.”
“Look men, NATURE!” 
The mussurana is an ophiophagous snake, meaning that it specializes in eating other snakes. It has around 15 strong teeth in the back of its mouth that it uses to pull the head of the  (still living) other snake into its gullet, at which point it wraps around its prey and strangles it. This behavior leads it to be called a “pseudoboa”.
Mussuaranas are immune to the venom of their prey - the pit vipers of Central and South America. However, the coral snake venom is still deadly to them.
Through the Brazilian Wilderness. Theodore Roosevelt, 1914.

biomedicalephemera:

The mussurama [mussurana] swallowing the jararaca, or fer-de-lance, after having just killed it.”

“Look men, NATURE!” 

The mussurana is an ophiophagous snake, meaning that it specializes in eating other snakes. It has around 15 strong teeth in the back of its mouth that it uses to pull the head of the  (still living) other snake into its gullet, at which point it wraps around its prey and strangles it. This behavior leads it to be called a “pseudoboa”.

Mussuaranas are immune to the venom of their prey - the pit vipers of Central and South America. However, the coral snake venom is still deadly to them.

Through the Brazilian Wilderness. Theodore Roosevelt, 1914.

It is Monday. Monday is sloth-like to me.
Arctopithecus flaccidus [now Bradypus tridactylus flaccidus]
This is a subspecies of the pale-throated sloth, which is one of the three-toed sloths. Pale-throated sloths, like most of their genus, live mostly solitary lives, but are around more creatures than you might think. In addition to the green algae that they live mutalistically with, they also have multiple species of insects, which live commensally within their fur.
The sloth moth and several beetle species live on the sloth itself, and lay their eggs in its droppings on the ground. The sloth provides both heat and camouflage to the insects, and the insects themselves don’t harm the sloth, so there is no benefit to expending energy removing them.
Proceedings of the Zoological Society of London. Illustrated by Joseph Smit, 1871.

It is Monday. Monday is sloth-like to me.

Arctopithecus flaccidus [now Bradypus tridactylus flaccidus]

This is a subspecies of the pale-throated sloth, which is one of the three-toed sloths. Pale-throated sloths, like most of their genus, live mostly solitary lives, but are around more creatures than you might think. In addition to the green algae that they live mutalistically with, they also have multiple species of insects, which live commensally within their fur.

The sloth moth and several beetle species live on the sloth itself, and lay their eggs in its droppings on the ground. The sloth provides both heat and camouflage to the insects, and the insects themselves don’t harm the sloth, so there is no benefit to expending energy removing them.

Proceedings of the Zoological Society of London. Illustrated by Joseph Smit, 1871.

Jacchus rufiventer [now Sanguinus labiatus rufiventer] - Red Bellied Marmoset [Red-Bellied Tamarin]
This is actually NOT a marmoset, as the authors believed it was. Tamarins are closely related to marmosets, but they have canine teeth that are larger than their incisors. This means that they can’t gnaw on tree bark to eat the gum underneath, like marmosets do. Despite this, their diet is largely the same as their close cousins.
Zoology of the H.M.S. Erebus & Terror. John Richardson and John Edward Gray, 1844.

Jacchus rufiventer [now Sanguinus labiatus rufiventer] - Red Bellied Marmoset [Red-Bellied Tamarin]

This is actually NOT a marmoset, as the authors believed it was. Tamarins are closely related to marmosets, but they have canine teeth that are larger than their incisors. This means that they can’t gnaw on tree bark to eat the gum underneath, like marmosets do. Despite this, their diet is largely the same as their close cousins.

Zoology of the H.M.S. Erebus & Terror. John Richardson and John Edward Gray, 1844.

“The mussurama [mussurana] swallowing the jararaca, or fer-de-lance, after having just killed it.”
"Look men, NATURE!" 
The mussurana is an ophiophagous snake, meaning that it specializes in eating other snakes. It has around 15 strong teeth in the back of its mouth that it uses to pull the head of the  (still living) other snake into its gullet, at which point it wraps around its prey and strangles it. This behavior leads it to be called a “pseudoboa”.
Mussuaranas are immune to the venom of their prey - the pit vipers of Central and South America. However, the coral snake venom is still deadly to them.
Through the Brazilian Wilderness. Theodore Roosevelt, 1914.

The mussurama [mussurana] swallowing the jararaca, or fer-de-lance, after having just killed it.”

"Look men, NATURE!" 

The mussurana is an ophiophagous snake, meaning that it specializes in eating other snakes. It has around 15 strong teeth in the back of its mouth that it uses to pull the head of the  (still living) other snake into its gullet, at which point it wraps around its prey and strangles it. This behavior leads it to be called a “pseudoboa”.

Mussuaranas are immune to the venom of their prey - the pit vipers of Central and South America. However, the coral snake venom is still deadly to them.

Through the Brazilian Wilderness. Theodore Roosevelt, 1914.