Posts tagged anteater

Giant Anteater - Myrmecophaga tridactyla

The giant anteater is much bigger than illustrations make them seem - males can get up to 90 lbs and over 7 feet long.

Their tongues are “elastic”, almost 2 feet long, coated in a sticky saliva, and anchored directly to their sternums, rather than the hyoid bone that anchors most mammalian tongues. They flick in and out almost 180 times per minute. As one might expect, they do not have teeth, but smash the ants against their palate before swallowing. Their stomachs are tough, but do not produce their own acid; they use the formic acid of the ants in order to digest.

Since the structure of termite mounds can be as tough as concrete in some places, the anteaters need strong, well-anchored claws to tear them open. These claws would get in the way while trotting through their environments, however, and as such, anteaters walk on their knuckles, much like the great apes.

Brehms Tierleben, Allgemeine Kunde des Tierreichs. Prof. Otto zur Strassen, 1912.

"The Smallest Anteater" (The Silky Anteater, Cyclopes didactylus dorsus)
This anteater is slow-moving and largely arboreal, much like their sloth cousins. However, they also have a partially prehensile tail, and eat, well, ants. Sometimes they also eat other insects that pass by them, but they don’t produce chitinase, so they can’t fully digest those bugs.
Types of Animal Life. St. George Mivart, 1893.

"The Smallest Anteater" (The Silky Anteater, Cyclopes didactylus dorsus)

This anteater is slow-moving and largely arboreal, much like their sloth cousins. However, they also have a partially prehensile tail, and eat, well, ants. Sometimes they also eat other insects that pass by them, but they don’t produce chitinase, so they can’t fully digest those bugs.

Types of Animal Life. St. George Mivart, 1893.

Giant Ant-Eater, Duck-Bill, Scaly Ant-Eater [Pangolin], Bristly Armadillo, Three-Toed Sloth
These are just awesome animals, all on one plate. How could I not post it? The Bristly Armadillo is listed as Dasypus setosus, but is now known as Euphractus sexcinctus, the Six-Banded Armadillo.
Natural History of the Animal Kingdom, for use of Young People. W. F. Kirby, 1889.

Giant Ant-Eater, Duck-Bill, Scaly Ant-Eater [Pangolin], Bristly Armadillo, Three-Toed Sloth

These are just awesome animals, all on one plate. How could I not post it? The Bristly Armadillo is listed as Dasypus setosus, but is now known as Euphractus sexcinctus, the Six-Banded Armadillo.

Natural History of the Animal Kingdom, for use of Young People. W. F. Kirby, 1889.

Comparison of development and adult forms of some mammalian brains. 
1. Six-banded Armadillo [Tatou Encoubert]
2. Temminck’s Pangolin [Pangolin de Temminck]
3. Giant Anteater [Fourmilier Tamanoir]
4. Aardvark [Oryctérope du Cap]
Memoire sur les Formes Cerebrals. Paul Gervais, 1853.

Comparison of development and adult forms of some mammalian brains. 

1. Six-banded Armadillo [Tatou Encoubert]

2. Temminck’s Pangolin [Pangolin de Temminck]

3. Giant Anteater [Fourmilier Tamanoir]

4. Aardvark [Oryctérope du Cap]

Memoire sur les Formes Cerebrals. Paul Gervais, 1853.




A selection from Zoological lectures delivered at the Royal Institution. George Shaw, 1809.

A selection from Zoological lectures delivered at the Royal Institution. George Shaw, 1809.