Posts tagged animal

biomedicalephemera:

Alligator and Crocodile Embryos.
Can I just say how adorable these are?
Transactions of the Zoological Society of London, Volume XI. 1885.

biomedicalephemera:

Alligator and Crocodile Embryos.

Can I just say how adorable these are?

Transactions of the Zoological Society of London, Volume XI. 1885.

To everyone asking: “Pangolin = sandshrew?”

Almost.

Baby Pangolin or 9-Ringed Armadillo x Shrew = Sandshrew.

Pangolin = SandSLASH.

ETA: PANGOLINS = BEST EVER by The Brain Scoop [I may be paraphrasing]

victoriasrustyknickers:

Octopus from Conradi Gesneri’s Historiae Animalium - published in 1551

victoriasrustyknickers:

Octopus from Conradi Gesneri’s Historiae Animalium - published in 1551

Six-Banded Armadillo, Tatouay, Truncated Clamyphore of Chili 
The “Truncated Clamyphore of Chili” is what we now know as the pink fairy armadillo, and the tatouay is also known as the Greater Naked-Tailed Armadillo.
These are all South American armadillos. The one North American armadillo (the nine-banded) is the coolest one, in my opinion. They always have identical quadruplets, because shortly after fertilization, the egg splits into four. Basically, it’s exactly the same thing that happens in humans when identical twins are formed, but each half splits again. They’re the only mammals that reliably manifest this trait, called polyembryony.
The Animal Kingdom, Arranged According to its Organization. Serving as a Foundation for the Natural History of Animals and an Introduction to Comparative Anatomy. Baron Cuvier, 1837.

Six-Banded Armadillo, Tatouay, Truncated Clamyphore of Chili 

The “Truncated Clamyphore of Chili” is what we now know as the pink fairy armadillo, and the tatouay is also known as the Greater Naked-Tailed Armadillo.

These are all South American armadillos. The one North American armadillo (the nine-banded) is the coolest one, in my opinion. They always have identical quadruplets, because shortly after fertilization, the egg splits into four. Basically, it’s exactly the same thing that happens in humans when identical twins are formed, but each half splits again. They’re the only mammals that reliably manifest this trait, called polyembryony.

The Animal Kingdom, Arranged According to its Organization. Serving as a Foundation for the Natural History of Animals and an Introduction to Comparative Anatomy. Baron Cuvier, 1837.

Rhinochetos jubatus

Skeleton and disarticulated bones of the “Kagu” - an endangered bird from the dense forests of New Caledonia.

Transactions of the Zoological Society of London. 1872.

Aye-aye skeleton and behavior.

Aye-ayes fill the same ecological niche as woodpeckers do, thanks to their loooong and skinny middle fingers that serve the same role as a woodpecker’s long tongue. In addition to their long, bug-picking fingers, they also have constantly-growing teeth. This led to early naturalists to classify them as “Rodentia”. They’re now considered relatives of the lemur, but that classification is still not certain; some species of aye-aye have rodent-like bone structures, and even though molecular genetics shows lemurs and aye-ayes having a relatively recent common ancestor, its classification is still challenged.

Transactions of the Zoological Society of London. 1872.

Gangrenous Ergotism (similar to fescue foot in winter-grazing cattle) in a cow, caused by ingesting ryegrasses or bromes infected with the parasitic fungus Claviceps purpurea. Can immediately cause hyperthermia (fever) and hypersalivation. The repeated constriction of the arterioles at first causes decreased blood flow to the extremities, and eventually (generally not before 2 months of exposure) causes terminal necrosis of extremities due to thrombosis.
It’s pretty gory condition as it progresses. The necrosis starts with dry gangrene around the fetlock or pastern, and animals that continue to eat ergot-infected grasses or feed can have their hooves, ears, and tail tips literally fall off. o_o 
Ergotism info from my production management classes, but can be read about at Merck Veterinary site.
Photograph from “Special Report on the Diseases of Cattle”, put out by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Animal Industry. 1912.

Gangrenous Ergotism (similar to fescue foot in winter-grazing cattle) in a cow, caused by ingesting ryegrasses or bromes infected with the parasitic fungus Claviceps purpurea. Can immediately cause hyperthermia (fever) and hypersalivation. The repeated constriction of the arterioles at first causes decreased blood flow to the extremities, and eventually (generally not before 2 months of exposure) causes terminal necrosis of extremities due to thrombosis.

It’s pretty gory condition as it progresses. The necrosis starts with dry gangrene around the fetlock or pastern, and animals that continue to eat ergot-infected grasses or feed can have their hooves, ears, and tail tips literally fall off. o_o 

Ergotism info from my production management classes, but can be read about at Merck Veterinary site.

Photograph from “Special Report on the Diseases of Cattle”, put out by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Animal Industry. 1912.