Posts tagged ai

"Little did Ai know, his portrait would inspire thousands of awkward high school portraits, more than 250 years later."

Image: Maned three-toed sloth - Bradypus torquatus. From Verzameling van uitlandsche en zeldzamme vogelen, benevens eenige vreemde dieren en plantgewassen. George Edwards and M. Catesby, 1781.

"Little did Ai know, his portrait would inspire thousands of awkward high school portraits, more than 250 years later."

image

Image: Maned three-toed sloth - Bradypus torquatus.
From Verzameling van uitlandsche en zeldzamme vogelen, benevens eenige vreemde dieren en plantgewassen. George Edwards and M. Catesby, 1781.

"Ai siue Ignavus" - Bradypus tridactylus
The title “Ai siue Ignavus" translates to "Ai, or Lazy", which were the two common names for the Pale-throated sloth at the time. The Bradypus genus is the genus of three-toed sloths, which are the ones who are descended from a common ancestor of the giant ground sloths - two-toed sloths are actually not closely-related to either three-toed or giant sloths. 
Even though they’re not closely-related, both sloth families share a unique trait: they don’t have seven cervical vertebrae, which is a trait of almost all mammals, including those with very short necks (such as whales) and very long necks (such as giraffes). The two-toed sloths have only six cervical vertebrae, and the three-toed sloths have nine cervical vertebrae. The extra vertebrae in the three-toed sloths are what allow them to have such flexibility in their neck, and how they can turn their head 180 degrees.
A Description of the Nature of Four-Footed Beasts. Joannes Jonstonus, 1678.

"Ai siue Ignavus" - Bradypus tridactylus

The title “Ai siue Ignavus" translates to "Ai, or Lazy", which were the two common names for the Pale-throated sloth at the time. The Bradypus genus is the genus of three-toed sloths, which are the ones who are descended from a common ancestor of the giant ground sloths - two-toed sloths are actually not closely-related to either three-toed or giant sloths. 

Even though they’re not closely-related, both sloth families share a unique trait: they don’t have seven cervical vertebrae, which is a trait of almost all mammals, including those with very short necks (such as whales) and very long necks (such as giraffes). The two-toed sloths have only six cervical vertebrae, and the three-toed sloths have nine cervical vertebrae. The extra vertebrae in the three-toed sloths are what allow them to have such flexibility in their neck, and how they can turn their head 180 degrees.

A Description of the Nature of Four-Footed Beasts. Joannes Jonstonus, 1678.