Posts tagged Prosthesis

miss-givings:

Upper limb prostheses, made for a 17 year-old boy in 1959

miss-givings:

Upper limb prostheses, made for a 17 year-old boy in 1959

cabbagingcove:

Demonstrating the use of a new model of prosthetic arm.
ca. 1950, Walter Reed Hospital

cabbagingcove:

Demonstrating the use of a new model of prosthetic arm.

ca. 1950, Walter Reed Hospital

adventures-of-the-blackgang:

Artificial ArmPatent drawing of Artificial Arm by John Condell, titled “Improvements in Artificial Arms,” issued as patent 48,659, dated July 11, 1865National Archives, Records of the Patent and Trademark Office

If anyone was wondering where the icon for my blog on the spotlight pages came from.

adventures-of-the-blackgang:

Artificial Arm

Patent drawing of Artificial Arm by John Condell, titled “Improvements in Artificial Arms,” issued as patent 48,659, dated July 11, 1865

National Archives, Records of the Patent and Trademark Office

If anyone was wondering where the icon for my blog on the spotlight pages came from.

When malignant (or other fast-growing) tumors of the jaws and gums form, one of the first things that is likely to happen is the teeth falling out. After excision of the cancerous tissue, the remaining bones are often left deformed and irregularly-shaped. 

One thing a lot of people don’t realize is often an aspect of the oncology field, is working with other specialists (such as orthodontists and reconstructive surgeons) and knowing the basics of those other fields, to ensure that once the cancer is eliminated, the patient will be able to have prostheses formed and comfortably attached, or reconstructive surgery will be able to restore some appearance/function. If the patient can’t have those, return to a “normal” life is made far more difficult. 
Of course, elimination of the cancer is paramount, but if patient is to return to an independent and quality life, you can’t just go in there and rip it out like they did for quite some time. 

Creating prostheses is a very skilled profession, even today. Despite all the technology and automation that we have, it still takes years and lots of training to master the nuanced ability to take a cast of a body part and create a comfortable and functional prosthetic device.

Illustrations from Tumors of the Jaws. Charles Locke Scudder, M.D., 1912.

Johnson-Norton Prosthetic Limbs, 1915 advertisement

Johnson-Norton Prosthetic Limbs, 1915 advertisement

Tumors of the Jaws. Charles Locke Scudder, 1912.

Tumors of the Jaws. Charles Locke Scudder, 1912.

Tumors of the Jaws. Charles Locke Scudder, 1912.

Tumors of the Jaws. Charles Locke Scudder, 1912.

ofpaperandponies:

questionableadvice:

~ Lancaster Herald, July 8, 1868 via LancasterHistory.org“ARTIFICIAL EYES, inserted without pain.”I wonder how many of the patients needing artificial eyes were ex-Civil War soldiers…

French eyes! Those were what the ones who could afford it got. They were the thing to have if you had an eye. Because artificial eyes apparently have trends.


From the Burns Archive. This guy lost his eye during the Civil War…obviously doesn’t have a “real” artificial eye, but has something inserted into the socket to maintain facial symmetry and bone structure. Over time, if nothing is kept in the socket, the bones around the eye socket can actually grow in ways that can deform the face even more. That deformation can pull the skin, and damage the ability to see out of the non-missing eye.

ofpaperandponies:

questionableadvice:

~ Lancaster Herald, July 8, 1868
via LancasterHistory.org

“ARTIFICIAL EYES, inserted without pain.”

I wonder how many of the patients needing artificial eyes were ex-Civil War soldiers…

French eyes! Those were what the ones who could afford it got. They were the thing to have if you had an eye. Because artificial eyes apparently have trends.

From the Burns Archive. This guy lost his eye during the Civil War…obviously doesn’t have a “real” artificial eye, but has something inserted into the socket to maintain facial symmetry and bone structure. Over time, if nothing is kept in the socket, the bones around the eye socket can actually grow in ways that can deform the face even more. That deformation can pull the skin, and damage the ability to see out of the non-missing eye.