Posts tagged North America

rhamphotheca:

scientificillustration: The Axolotl and the Mudpuppy

n222_w1150 by BioDivLibrary on Flickr.

rhamphotheca:

scientificillustration: The Axolotl and the Mudpuppy

n222_w1150 by BioDivLibrary on Flickr.

rhamphotheca:

Northern Pygmy Owl (Glaucidium gnoma)
from the journal Ibis (1875), by John Gerrard Keulemans

rhamphotheca:

Northern Pygmy Owl (Glaucidium gnoma)

from the journal Ibis (1875), by John Gerrard Keulemans

American Cross Fox
This is actually a partially-melanistic form of the red fox (Vulpes vulpes) - like the fully-melanistic silver fox, the only difference between the Cross Fox and the red fox is the coloration of the coat. There seem to be differences in body size and coat texture between the three, but it’s been shown that those differences are due to environment and diet.
The Quadrupeds of North America. John James Audubon, 1851.
ETA: This is actually  a gray fox. Whoops.

American Cross Fox

This is actually a partially-melanistic form of the red fox (Vulpes vulpes) - like the fully-melanistic silver fox, the only difference between the Cross Fox and the red fox is the coloration of the coat. There seem to be differences in body size and coat texture between the three, but it’s been shown that those differences are due to environment and diet.

The Quadrupeds of North America. John James Audubon, 1851.

ETA: This is actually  a gray fox. Whoops.

Brown Bear Bathing
Nothin’ better than a flowing stream to wash away the remnants of your winter cave…or for a good (and cleaning) scratch on the pebbly substrate!
Wild life of the world: a descriptive survey of the geographic distribution of animals. Richard Lydekker, 1915.

Brown Bear Bathing

Nothin’ better than a flowing stream to wash away the remnants of your winter cave…or for a good (and cleaning) scratch on the pebbly substrate!

Wild life of the world: a descriptive survey of the geographic distribution of animals. Richard Lydekker, 1915.

Brown Bear (Ursus arctos)
You wouldn’t want to be anywhere near this bear. Females with cubs are not only aggressive when you get near their babies, but are territorial in general - many are more aggressive than even adult males.
Wild life of the world: a descriptive survey of the geographic distribution of animals. Richard Lydekker, 1915.

Brown Bear (Ursus arctos)

You wouldn’t want to be anywhere near this bear. Females with cubs are not only aggressive when you get near their babies, but are territorial in general - many are more aggressive than even adult males.

Wild life of the world: a descriptive survey of the geographic distribution of animals. Richard Lydekker, 1915.

dendroica:

n168_w1150 by BioDivLibrary on Flickr.
Via Flickr: Field book of North American mammals New York,G. P. Putnam’s Sons,1928.biodiversitylibrary.org/item/38166

dendroica:

n168_w1150 by BioDivLibrary on Flickr.

Via Flickr:
Field book of North American mammals
New York,G. P. Putnam’s Sons,1928.
biodiversitylibrary.org/item/38166

Skeleton of Mesohippus bairdi
The Mesohippus lived in the late Eocene to early Ogliocene eras (30-40 million years ago), in North America. These proto-horses had three toes, and primarily used the center toe. Though they were structurally a long way off from the modern horse (not to mention only 60 cm/~2 ft tall), they were much closer to the Equus ferus we know than their ancestors, the Hyracotherium. Aside from their feet, their teeth and legs were moving quickly up the the evolutionary ladder.
Notes on the Osteology of the White River Horses. Marcus S. Farr, 1896.

Skeleton of Mesohippus bairdi

The Mesohippus lived in the late Eocene to early Ogliocene eras (30-40 million years ago), in North America. These proto-horses had three toes, and primarily used the center toe. Though they were structurally a long way off from the modern horse (not to mention only 60 cm/~2 ft tall), they were much closer to the Equus ferus we know than their ancestors, the Hyracotherium. Aside from their feet, their teeth and legs were moving quickly up the the evolutionary ladder.

Notes on the Osteology of the White River Horses. Marcus S. Farr, 1896.

scientificillustration:

n162_w1150 by BioDivLibrary on Flickr.
Hoary Marmot or Whistler
Wild animals of North AmericaWashington, D.C.,The National geographical society[c1918]biodiversitylibrary.org/item/37554

scientificillustration:

n162_w1150 by BioDivLibrary on Flickr.

Hoary Marmot or Whistler

Wild animals of North America
Washington, D.C.,The National geographical society[c1918]
biodiversitylibrary.org/item/37554

rhamphotheca:

dendroica: Red-shouldered hawk with Ribbon Snake

n224_w1150 by BioDivLibrary on Flickr.
Via Flickr:Birds and nature in natural colors. v.1.Chicago :A.W. Mumford, Publisher,1913-1914.biodiversitylibrary.org/item/33165

rhamphotheca:

dendroica: Red-shouldered hawk with Ribbon Snake

n224_w1150 by BioDivLibrary on Flickr.

Via Flickr:
Birds and nature in natural colors. v.1.
Chicago :A.W. Mumford, Publisher,1913-1914.
biodiversitylibrary.org/item/33165

scientificillustration:

n11_w1150 by BioDivLibrary on Flickr.
The Alaska Brown Bear
From: Wild animals of North America
Washington, D.C.,The National geographical society[c1918]biodiversitylibrary.org/item/37554

scientificillustration:

n11_w1150 by BioDivLibrary on Flickr.

The Alaska Brown Bear

From: Wild animals of North America

Washington, D.C.,The National geographical society[c1918]
biodiversitylibrary.org/item/37554

Animal Guide: North American Wild Animals. Charles K. Reed, 1915.

Animal Guide: North American Wild Animals. Charles K. Reed, 1915.

Black rats (Rattus rattus) are smaller and more agile than brown rats, and are known as “roof rats”, for their propensity to climb power lines and roofs and infest attics (as opposed to ground floors/cellars/sewers like brown rats do). They’re also the rats that carried the fleas that brought Yersinia pestis to Europe in the middle ages.
Quadrupeds of North America. John James Audubon. 1851.

Black rats (Rattus rattus) are smaller and more agile than brown rats, and are known as “roof rats”, for their propensity to climb power lines and roofs and infest attics (as opposed to ground floors/cellars/sewers like brown rats do). They’re also the rats that carried the fleas that brought Yersinia pestis to Europe in the middle ages.

Quadrupeds of North America. John James Audubon. 1851.

Um. Lost those European Badgers. Here’s an American one…it’s by Audubon, so hopefully that makes up for it :D Will hunt those European ones down in a sec.
From Quadrupeds of North America by John James Audubon. 1851.

Um. Lost those European Badgers. Here’s an American one…it’s by Audubon, so hopefully that makes up for it :D Will hunt those European ones down in a sec.

From Quadrupeds of North America by John James Audubon. 1851.