Greater Kudu - Tragelaphus strepsiceros
The Greater Kudu is the spiral-horned antelope you’ll find if you travel farther south than the savanna of central Kenya (north of which, the Lesser Kudu reigns). As a browsing ruminant, they can be found in small herds - though their population is declining rapidly - in most dry, warm, southern grasslands of Africa, where browsing material (bushes and shrubs) and a water supply is present.
Though humans have hunted the Greater Kudu (both for their horns and their meat) since antiquity, and still do to an extent that they’re decreasing in population faster than they can reproduce, there is a curious upside to the modern human presence in southern Africa: as humans divert rivers and water sources to irrigate crops and trees, the territory of the Greater Kudu has increased impressively. The increased amount of dry territory with a water source has allowed the species to roam much farther than it ever would have naturally. Whether the spreading out of the still-declining population is a net gain for the species is not yet known.
Wild Life of the World. Richard Lydekker. Volume III. 1916.

Greater Kudu - Tragelaphus strepsiceros

The Greater Kudu is the spiral-horned antelope you’ll find if you travel farther south than the savanna of central Kenya (north of which, the Lesser Kudu reigns). As a browsing ruminant, they can be found in small herds - though their population is declining rapidly - in most dry, warm, southern grasslands of Africa, where browsing material (bushes and shrubs) and a water supply is present.

Though humans have hunted the Greater Kudu (both for their horns and their meat) since antiquity, and still do to an extent that they’re decreasing in population faster than they can reproduce, there is a curious upside to the modern human presence in southern Africa: as humans divert rivers and water sources to irrigate crops and trees, the territory of the Greater Kudu has increased impressively. The increased amount of dry territory with a water source has allowed the species to roam much farther than it ever would have naturally. Whether the spreading out of the still-declining population is a net gain for the species is not yet known.

Wild Life of the World. Richard Lydekker. Volume III. 1916.

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    kudu
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    This was my favourite animal when I was about 5 after having visited South Africa. I think it was the horns. I remember...
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