biomedicalephemera:

Biomedical Ephemera’s Cat Surgery and Wedding Celebration Giveaway!

ALRIGHT! Let’s do this. I’ve been meaning to do a giveaway for a really long time, so I’ve accumulated WAY too much stuff. Why now? Because I’m getting married in, like, three weeks, and I want to share some of the celebration with you guys! Yay!

Save Zarkoth, Destroyer of Carpets!

Much more importantly, though, I’m also doing this because my kitty needs his tooth removed, and all of our upcoming expenses mean that we can’t get this done on our own. The full story is at the donation website, and I want to get the word out that an awesome kitty could use a buck or two if you have it.

You do not have to donate to be entered into the giveaway. I really just want to get the word out so that those who can help know about it.

With that out of the way, this is the first of three lots - the other two will be posted at the end of the month, after this is concluded.

Lot 1:

  • ONE “Dr. Miles’ New Joke Book” from 1936 Full of terrible jokes and testimonials. Advertisement for Dr. Miles’ Anti-Pain Pills.
  • Choice of TWO: Inflatable Frog, Inflatable Bird, Inflatable Turtle, fossil Deinonychus life-sized wall wrap.
  • ONE Inflatable Perch Including internal organs illustrated on the side, with diagrams and teaching tools.
  • ONE Kidney-On-A-Stick Reverse is a regular kidney model, without internal components shown.
  • Choice of ONE: Inflatable Marie Curie OR Benjamin Franklin. Perfect for pranking or terrifying your science-inclined friends! Both heads have trivia about their subjects on the back.
  • THREE “Wild Wraps” Bush babies and black panthers. Perfect for organizing cords, hanging from your ponytail, or guarding your treasures!
  • Choice of ONE:
    100 Flowers and How They Got Their Names by Diana Wells OR Wicked Bugs by Amy Stewart. Both are fascinating, have bizarre, curious, and fun trivia and facts about their subjects, and I’ve used both as resources for the blog!

Giveaway Rules:

Again, you do not have to donate OR follow me to be entered, but if you like any of this stuff, you’ll probably like my blog! 

  1. "Like" the post for one entry, reblog for a second entry. Two entries max. If the post is reblogged more than once, only the first two times will count.
  2. Winner will be chosen via Random Number Generator.
  3. The winner will be chosen on Monday, April 21, 2014.
  4. Winner will be contacted via “Ask” so please keep your ask box open!
  5. Winner will have three days to respond, before I re-roll the number.
  6. I will ship worldwide.
  7. What with the wedding, kitty surgery, and everything else coming up, please allow up to 4 weeks for delivery - though hopefully it will only take a few days!
  8. If you win this lot, you cannot win another. Feel free to promote them all, though ;D
  9. Give yourself a hug, because you’re awesome and love weird science!
biomedicalephemera:

Man (Homo sapiens sapiens), Cow (Bos taurus), and Ram (Ovis aries)
The structure of the ruminant animals varies considerably. It’s important for the artist to recognize the vertebral layout and rib structure, even of animals that are covered in thick wool or fur. Wild bovids (such as bison) and aurochs have extended thoracic vertebrae that form a “hump” over their shoulders.
A Comparative View of the Human and Animal Frame. B. Waterhouse Hawkins, 1860.

biomedicalephemera:

Man (Homo sapiens sapiens), Cow (Bos taurus), and Ram (Ovis aries)

The structure of the ruminant animals varies considerably. It’s important for the artist to recognize the vertebral layout and rib structure, even of animals that are covered in thick wool or fur. Wild bovids (such as bison) and aurochs have extended thoracic vertebrae that form a “hump” over their shoulders.

A Comparative View of the Human and Animal Frame. B. Waterhouse Hawkins, 1860.

Does milk leech calcium from bones? — Asked by Anonymous

Okay, third time I’ve gotten this question.

As a dairy science humaoid: NO, IT DOES NOT.

Unless you have been drinking only milk your entire life, and then suddenly drink only water, there is no plausible way I can think of that milk would leach calcium from your bones. And even THEN, you’d only leach it from your bones for a few days/weeks at most, if you had other calcium sources. Even if those sources are harder for the digestive system to access than milk, they probably have more calcium to make up for it, and are just fine in the long run.

———————————————————-

In the end you need plenty of calcium AND VITAMIN D for both your bones and guts, and milk is an alright source for those.

But honestly, rich leafy greens like kale, cheese (especially parmasean and its ilk), sardines, and tofu are all excellent sources of calcium, and don’t have the same sugar content as milk.

Yes, most of them are much higher in fat content, but that means that they remind your brain “SHIT SON THAT’S GOOD WE HAVE ENERGY FOR THE NEXT 8 HOURS!” and not “OH NO! NEED LONG-SUSTAINING FUD, ONLY HAVE SUGARS AVAILABLE!”

Regardless, milk does not leach from the bones, it is NOT the best source of calcium, it is not necessarily bad, and not always the best.

I love cows, I love dairy science, LOVE cheese, and I love my home state. I am also an eternal skeptic and believer in science, and do not appreciate the Dairy Council taking my money and turning it into what amounts to propaganda in some campaigns.

======================

Seek the truth for yourself. Learn how science and critical thinking work, and read the studies people claim “support” their viewpoint. Figure out if they’re correct or not, but don’t assume you know how to do so until you actually understand how science and critical thinking work.

You’re you’re own best advocate.

tl;dr: Nope, it doesn’t. But don’t believe that it’s the miracle drink it’s marketed as, either - especially if you’re past adolescence.

Have you got some Irish attired on your wrist? — Asked by Anonymous

Yeaaaahh. Saol amháin on the left wrist, mair é on the right. Basically YOLO in Irish (aka Irish Gaelic). “One life, Live it.”

Got it after going through a solid year of hell, after getting into a massive car wreck 1100 miles from home, getting really fucked-up in the head, having an extremely messed-up summer, and a semester of school where there were days I could hardly get out of bed.

Finally started to get out of that shitty state of being, but would fall back into it every time I didn’t have active commitments that people were holding me to - I drove Bennett to his student teaching assignment (2 hours there and back every morning) but couldn’t bring myself to do more than that at some points.

So I had to remind myself that this life was all I had - there was nothing more, and I had to make the most of it. This life may suck, but I can make it better. Shit will always drag me down, but if I do nothing, I mean nothing. I want to be something after I’m gone.

——————————————————————————-

And, because of course, 18 months later “YOLO” became a *thing*. Fuck whoever made that start.

Of course, I have my brother’s Raven on my left wrist, now, too. I’m going to be getting my triskele and shamrocks touched up (and made less meh) too, and getting a primrose on my right wrist sooner rather than later.

Also in searching for this pic I realized I had a surprising proportion of naked people on my personal blog’s “tattoo” tag.

Uvulas!

We all know about our uvula - or at least the palatine uvula - the one in our mouths. This hanging mass at the back of our mouth is formed from the soft palate, and is involved in the gag reflex and some languages (but not English). But did you know that we have more uvulas than just that?

Uvula means “little grape"in Latin, and a swollen uvula is called "ūvawhich is simply “grape”. Hanging grapes everywhere!

Everyone also has a cerebellar uvula, which is right next to the cerebellar tonsils (more tonsils!) and at the end of the cerebeallar vermis (“cerebellar worm”). This area of the brain is involved in posture and locomotion.

In addition to both of those, males also have a uvula of the urinary bladder. This is less of a “little grape”, and more of a slight elevation in the internal urethral orifice, caused by the prostate.

Anatomy: Descriptive and Surgical. Gray’s Anatomy, 1918.
[illustration source]

whats wrong with your cat? — Asked by Anonymous

I explain most of it at the link

Long story short, he’s got an abscessed tooth because of pre-existing terrible teeth (he was a street cat for a few years) that’s been getting reinfected and is eating farther into his nasal cavity, and needs to be removed before he becomes septic or gets in so much pain that he can’t eat.

He’s otherwise healthy (if a bit fat), so we really don’t want to lose him or force him to go through unnecessary pain for no reason.

Zarks is one of the few things we have left of my fiance’s mom, and in addition to our upcoming wedding, we also have my personal medical expenses (going onto a new insurance) coming up, so we’ve been put in a position where, if we have to cover everything ourselves, we’d be forced to put this surgery off to the point where it could very very easily devolve into a life-or-death situation.

OKAY. YEAH. Kitty sad and having infected tooth. Kitty has infected tooth because of previous life on the streets leading to cracked canine that, for the past 4 years, we’ve managed to keep uninfected. But now things are getting serious and we need some help. :( I’m the last person to ask anyone for help - I am so stupidly prideful that I give up incredibly important things just so that I don’t have to ask for help. But even doing that, we don’t have enough for this surgery and his follow-up care.

Read more at the actual site

image

Zarkster loves you! Help him out <3 

unnaturalist:

There once was an Ichthyosaurus,Who lived when the earth was all porous,Be he fainted with shameWhen he first heard his name,And departed a long time before us.
biomedicalephemera:

Animaux perdus [“Lost Animals” - colloquial term for extinct creatures]
*kercrunch*
Dictionnaire Pittoresque d’Histoire Naturelle et des Phenomenes de la Nature. F. E. Guerin, 1833.


I forgot this post. 
*kercrunch*

unnaturalist:

There once was an Ichthyosaurus,
Who lived when the earth was all porous,
Be he fainted with shame
When he first heard his name,
And departed a long time before us.

biomedicalephemera:

Animaux perdus [“Lost Animals” - colloquial term for extinct creatures]

*kercrunch*

Dictionnaire Pittoresque d’Histoire Naturelle et des Phenomenes de la Nature. F. E. Guerin, 1833.

I forgot this post.

*kercrunch*

Biomedical Ephemera’s Cat Surgery and Wedding Celebration Giveaway!

ALRIGHT! Let’s do this. I’ve been meaning to do a giveaway for a really long time, so I’ve accumulated WAY too much stuff. Why now? Because I’m getting married in, like, three weeks, and I want to share some of the celebration with you guys! Yay!

**Save Zarkoth, Destroyer of Carpets!**

Much more importantly, though, I’m also doing this because my kitty needs his tooth removed, and all of our upcoming expenses mean that we can’t get this done on our own. The full story is at the donation website, and I want to get the word out that an awesome kitty could use a buck or two if you have it.

You do not have to donate to be entered into the giveaway. I really just want to get the word out so that those who can help know about it.

With that out of the way, this is the first of three lots - the other two will be posted at the end of the month, after this is concluded.

Lot 1:

  • ONE “Dr. Miles’ New Joke Book” from 1936 Full of terrible jokes and testimonials. Advertisement for Dr. Miles’ Anti-Pain Pills.
  • Choice of TWO: Inflatable Frog, Inflatable Bird, Inflatable Turtle, fossil Deinonychus life-sized wall wrap.
  • ONE Inflatable Perch Including internal organs illustrated on the side, with diagrams and teaching tools.
  • ONE Kidney-On-A-Stick Reverse is a regular kidney model, without internal components shown.
  • Choice of ONE: Inflatable Marie Curie OR Benjamin Franklin. Perfect for pranking or terrifying your science-inclined friends! Both heads have trivia about their subjects on the back.
  • THREE “Wild Wraps” Bush babies and black panthers. Perfect for organizing cords, hanging from your ponytail, or guarding your treasures!
  • Choice of ONE:
    100 Flowers and How They Got Their Names by Diana Wells OR Wicked Bugs by Amy Stewart. Both are fascinating, have bizarre, curious, and fun trivia and facts about their subjects, and I’ve used both as resources for the blog!

Giveaway Rules:

Again, you do not have to donate OR follow me to be entered, but if you like any of this stuff, you’ll probably like my blog!
Check it out!

  1. "Like" the post for one entry, reblog for a second entry. Two entries max. If the post is reblogged more than once, only the first two times will count.
  2. Winner will be chosen via Random Number Generator.
  3. The winner will be chosen on Monday, April 21, 2014.
  4. Winner will be contacted via “Ask” so please keep your ask box open!
  5. Winner will have three days to respond, before I re-roll the number.
  6. I will ship worldwide.
  7. What with the wedding, kitty surgery, and everything else coming up, please allow up to 4 weeks for delivery - though hopefully it will only take a few days!
  8. If you win this lot, you cannot win another. Feel free to promote them all, though ;D
  9. Give yourself a hug, because you’re awesome and love weird science!

Anatomy and Position of the Kidney in the body

The kidney is a fascinating and under-appreciated organ. Even its name is interesting: while the Greek nephros and the Latin renes are both used as medical terms for the kidney and its anatomy, the origin of the common name in English - “kidney” - is actually unknown. It may be from the Old English terms cwið (womb) + ey (egg), from its shape, but there is no clear consensus on its origins.

The kidney serves many functions, but its most obvious is creating urine. The process of doing that is surprisingly complex, and involves regulation of blood pressure, re-absorbing vital nutrients, excreting urea from protein catabolism, and secreting hormones such as erythropoietin (which stimulates red blood cell creation).

These are four major sections of the kidney:

  • Capsule - A tough, fibrous layer of tissue, surrounded by a thick layer of fat, which protects the kidney.
  • Cortex - Just inside the capsule, the outermost layer of the kidney itself, which contains renal corpuscules and tubules. Ultrafiltration and erythropoietin production happens here.
  • Medulla -  The inner tissue of the kidney, split up into renal pyramids. This is where the arteries split up, serum comes out of the blood, and ions and glucose are processed.
  • Renal Pelvis - This is the convergence point of the major calcyes, and funnels urine into the ureter, which goes to the bladder. The transitional epithelium in this section of the kidney is the cause of many types of kidney cancers.

Anatomy: Descriptive and Applied. Henry Gray, 1918.

biomedicalephemera:

Dr. Mary Edwards Walker’s pocket surgical kit

Dr. Walker was the first female surgeon in the U.S. Army, serving during the Civil War.

She was awarded the Medal of Honor in 1865 by President Johnson, and remains the only woman to have ever won it, to this date. Interestingly, this high honor was awarded to her (and even had a bill passed in order to make her eligible) in order to recognize her service to the country…while making sure that she didn’t receive an army commission in retirement.

Indeed, she made less as a pensioner than the widows of most officers did, but she saw the greater honor of her Medal, wearing it every day until her death in 1917.

Walker also campaigned as an abolitionist (prior to the war), prohibitionist, and an advocate for dress reform, citing women’s clothing as “immodest and unwieldy”. She was arrested several times in the late 1800s for “impersonating a man”, because of her trousers and top hat.

They always have these specials on the Civil War, but it's always about the war itself and not so much other things - I was curious, due to all the types of ailments and injuries and such that occurred during the war, was there a lot of medical advancement that took place during that time, or perhaps directly after? And, if so, do you have any recommended readings on the subject? (thanks in advance, I love your blog :D) — Asked by Anonymous

Conflicts with major casualties almost always also lead to major advancements in at least one field of medicine. The US Civil War was a huge huge time for medical advancement and achievement, and it sped up the advancement of the already-improving state of medicine in the US considerably.

There’s actually an entire museum dedicated to Civil War Medicine.

The director of that museum gave a good series of short talks on Youtube, detailing myths and advancements during the war.

Harvard has a permanent exhibit on that war’s medicine called Battle-Scarred.

The National Museum of Health and Medicine’s Otis Archives has an excellent collection of photographic and illustrative Civil War Medicine.

I’ve actually used several pics from the NMHM previously on here. I’ll probably post more in the future, but for now, have fun browsing on your own!

spacetravelco:

Scientific engravings from 1850

by John Philipps Emslie

(via the Wellcome Collection)

Wait, you're a girl? All this time I thought you were a skeleton — Asked by Anonymous

You’re confusing me with fuckyeahforensics

That’s basically the only real skeleton that runs a blog on here.

I am seriously addicted to your blog like its kinda wierd, sorry but I love you, you should post some selfies ;) — Asked by Anonymous

Well, my blog IS kinda weird. But that’s how I do, so it’s all good. Also selfies are not my thing. But I’ve posted pics of myself previously, probably.

heres another

Ways to die: Bright’s Disease

biomedicalephemera:

image

Bright’s Disease, something YOU will hopefully never be diagnosed with, because if you are, well, you’re going to a quack! Or you’ve stepped into a time machine, whichever.

Even when it was first described and elucidated, Bright’s Disease was a fairly vague diagnosis. It could be could be acute or chronic, fatal or just annoying, but always had to do with the kidneys. The symptoms that Bright described as characteristic of this condition were not unique to one disease, or even one internal problem. The kidneys could be inflamed, degenerating, non-functional, or even hemorrhaging outside of the urinary tract, but so long as notable levels of protein (albumin) were in the urine, patent medicine companies and alkali or vegetable “cure” quacks were all right there waiting for you to want a solution.

That said, Richard Bright did a good deal when it came to being observant and putting forth theories and methods regarding dropsy (edema), and was correct about kidney disease causing edema of the legs and around the eyes. He also produced some of the best and most detailed illustrations of diseased and normal kidney tissues that were available before Gray - and even Gray didn’t have better illustrations of diseased tissues.

Symptoms of Bright’s Disease:

  • Serious back pain
  • High blood pressure
  • Severe or mild edema
  • "Phantom testicular agony" (?)
  • fever
  • vomiting
  • Any or all of the above, so long as it’s in conjunction with cloudy, smoky, or bloody urine, with high albumin levels

Diseases that often fell under the net of Bright’s Disease

  • General Nephritis (kidney inflammation), all forms, including pyelonephritis, which is an acute kidney infection that can quickly lead to kidney failure if not treated with antibiotics
  • Chronic Kidney Disease, either primary or secondary
  • Glomerulonephritis (inflammation of the filtering membrane within the kidney) was common, occasionally glomerulosclerosis (hardening of the filtering membrane tissue) is also thought to have been the primary cause of a diagnosis of Bright’s disease - much less common than glomerulonephritis
  • Polycystic Kidneys
  • Systemic Lupus leading to Lupus Nephritis
  • Diabetic Nephritis 
  • Many other less common maladies that we now know are not just one disease…

Famous victims of Bright’s Disease

Though we now have some idea of what a few of these people died of, thanks to medical records and the reports of relatives of their symptoms, many people are recorded to have simply died of “Bright’s Disease”. Here are a few people that suffered from it, though not all perished due to the condition:

  • Chester A. Arthur, 21st president of the United States
  • Alexander III of Russia
  • John Bunny, vaudeville and silent film actor
  • Ty Cobb, Baseball Hall-of-Famer
  • James Creelman, very sketchy Canadian journalist…major player in the yellow journalism going on in the early 20th century
  • Emily Dickenson
  • Gregor Mendel
  • Aldo Leopold
  • H. P. Lovecraft (developed and died from “Bright’s Disease” while dealing with intestinal cancer)
  • Alice Hathaway Lee Roosevelt, first wife of President Theodore Roosevelt
  • Ellen Wilson, first wife of President Woodrow Wilson
  • Bram Stoker (developed it, suffered one stroke, had it intensify, had another stroke, died soon after)

Sources: Medline Plus, Science and Practice of Medicine in the Nineteenth Century, W. F. Bynum, 1994, Wikipedia (I know, I know, but I wanted to know who’s died from it)